Skip to main content

Full text of "Gladding, McBean"

See other formats


CALIFORNIA 

STATE LIBRARY 



III 



2007 1S1SM71 fi 

California State Library 



*>. McG. McBEAN, PRESIDENT 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



A J GLADDING, VICE-PRESIDENT GEORGE R. CHAMBERS, SECRETARY 

LINCOLN. CAL. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



ORGANIZED 1875 



INCORPORATED 1886 



Catalogue No. 30 




MANUFACTURERS 



Architectural Terra Cotta 



For INDEX See Page 121 



Do not mutilate this Catalogue to send us 
the Cuts. 

In ordering give the Number and Page, 
also the SIZB of article wanted. 




The street numbers on the upper end of 
Market Street are somewhat mixed. Our office 
is on the North side of the street, midway 
between 7th and 8th Streets, Nos. 1358-1360. 



ings 



No. i 358- I 360 Market Street Cor. 14th and Webster Sts. 

San Francisco. Cal. Oakland, Cal. 



I SAN FRANCISCO . SOUTH 41 

TELEPHONES 1 OAKLAND MAIN 262 

I LINCOLN MAIN 11 



r>. McG. McBEAN, President A J- GLADDING, Vice-President GEORGE R. CHAMBERS, Secretary 

S»N FRANCISCO, CAL LINCOLN. CAL, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

ORGANIZED 1875 ^ INCORPORATED 1886 

Catalogue no. 30 



iLADD.l.NG.. JMc.BCAN.^^ 



MANUFACTURERS 



Architectural Terra Cotta 

Vitrified Salt Glazed Sewer Pipe 

WATER PIPE, TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY PIPE AND TOPS 

HOLLOW TILE FIRE-PROOFING 

PRESSED BRICK 



Acid Cocks 


Culvert Pipe Fire Clay 


(■ 


rease Traps 


Acid Crocks 


Drain Tile Fire Brick Dust 




Kitchen Sinks 


Acid Pipes 


Enameled Brick Fire Tile 




Laundry Tubs 


Acid Plates 


Enameled Terra Cotta Flower Pots 




Lawn Vases 


Acid Receivers 


Enameled Hollow Tile Flue Linings 




Roofing Tile 


Brick and Tile Mantels Fire Brick Flush Tanks 




Stove Linings 




WORKS : 







LINCOLN, PLACER COUNTY, CAL. 

•(Lincoln is mi tliu Oregon Division of the Southern PaciBc, ten miles from RosevUle, its junction with the Main " 
WAIN OFFICE BRANCH 

No. 1358- I 360 Market Street Cor. 14th and Webster Sts. 

San Francisco, Cal. Oakland, Cal. 



| SAN FRANCISCO . SOUTH 41 

TELEPHONES , OAKLAND MAIN 262 

I LINCOLN MAIN 11 



To the Trade 



WE RESPECTFULLY present for your consideration an illustrated 
Catalogue and Price List of the principal articles manufactured 
by us, which will enable purchasers to place their orders intelligently. 

If any clay wares not mentioned in our catalogue should be required, 
by sending us a description or drawing we will endeavor to fill the order 
in reasonable time. 

Our principal aim is to produce goods that will insure satisfaction, 
and our ability to do so is shown by the rapid increase in our business 
and the repeated enlargement of our works. 

Thanking you for past favors, we solicit a continuance of your 

patronage. 

Respectfully yours, 

Gladding, McBean & Co. 

A Liberal Discount to the Trade. 



The Numbers and Prices given in this Catalogue supersede those in previous ones. 



"GET THE BEST, 



Our Vitrified Salt Glazed 



tt 



Is the Standard wherever it has been brought before the Public. 



TRUE IN FORM, PERFECTLY FITTING JOINTS, COMPACTNESS OF BODY. 



Sold as Low as any Pipe of Equal Quality. 



It is manufactured from a combination of the celebrated LINCOLN CLAYS, which, by careful 
analysis, are found to be unequaled for this purpose. 

By skilled labor and powerful machinery, of the latest and best designs, 
the material is rendered homogeneous and uniform throughout — under great pressure the pipe 
is made very compact and at high temperature becomes of a thoroughly vitrified 
and iron-like body, which is impervious to the action of acids, gases and 

Steam, all of which are found in sewers. 

The kilns in which these pipes are burned are so constructed as to secure a uniform heat, vitri- 
fying each piece of pipe. Tests of a similar pipe, by hydrostatic pressure, at the East, where it 
has been used for over forty years, with entire satisfaction to city authorities, and also by external 
crushing at the \".u \ Yard at Washington, in competition with the best English and Scotch Pipe, 
showed a strength superior to any other pipe. 

With largely increased facilities for manufacturing, this pipe can now be offered in quantities to 
suit purchasers, in sizes from 3 to 30 inch caliber, with the latest and most improved fittings. 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Vitrified Salt Glazed Sewer Pipe. 

PRICE LISTS. 
FIRST QUALITY STANDARD PIPE. 



Caliber 

of 

Pipe 


i'rice 
per 
Foot 


Branches 
Each 


Curves 
and 

Elbows 


Reducers 

or 
Increasers 


Hand 
Hole 
Traps 


Traps 


Traps 


Thick- 
ness 
of Pipe 


Weight 
Per Foot 


Feet to 

15. ton 

Carloads 


Area 

in 
Inches 


3" 


$0 15 


$0 60 


$0 50 




* 

$1 75 


$1 25 


$1 75 


%" 


6 lbs. 


5000 


7 


4" 


20 


80 


60 


$0 60 


2 00 


I 5° 


2 00 


%" 


7^ lbs. 


4OOO 


I2j4 


5" 


25 


I OO 


75 


75 


2 5° 


2 OO 


2 5° 


5/8" 


1 1 J^lbs. 


2600 


ig'A 


6" 


30 


I 20 


1 00 


90 


3 °° 


2 50 


3 °° 


Yx" 


16 lbs. 


1880 


28 % 


8" 


40 


I 60 


1 50 


1 20 


4 00 






Ya" 


22 lbs. 


1364 


50^ 


10" 


60 


2 40 


2 10 


1 80 


6 00 






%" 


31 lbs. 


970 


7834 


12" 


75 


3 °° 


2 75 


2 25 




P and S ' 


'raps with 


tt" 


41 lbs. 


732 


'13 


»4" 


1 00 


4 00 


3 75 


3 00 




Hand Hole 


I " 


50 lbs. 


60O 


■54 


16" 


1 25 


5 00 


4 25 


3 75 




25c Adc 


ilional 


I*" 


66 lbs. 


456 


201 


18" 


« 50 


6 00 


4 75 


4 50 








«*" 


So lbs. 


376 


254^ 


20" 


1 75 


7 00 


5 75 


5 25 








■X" 


90 lbs. 


334 


3'4 


22" 


2 10 


8 40 


7 00 


6 30 








IV." 


100 lbs. 


300 


380 


24" 


2 50 


10 00 


8 00 


7 5o 








ij<" 


120 lbs. 


250 


452^ 


30" 


4 00 


16 00 


16 00 


16 00 








!*" 


190 lbs. 


158 


707 



FIRST QUALITY DOUBLE STRENGTH PIPE. 



Caliber 

of 

Pipe 


Price 
per 

Foot 


Branches 
Bach 


Curves 

and 
Elbows 


Reducers 

or 
Increasers 


Thickness 

of 

Pipe 


Weight 
Per Foot 


Feet to 
15-ton 

Carloads 


Area 

111 
Inches 


15" 


$1 10 


$4 4° 


$4 4° 


$4 40 


ijr 


65 lbs. 


462 


177 


18" 


1 5° 


6 00 


6 00 


6 00 


.■r 


100 lbs. 


3OO 


-54'- 


21" 


2 00 


8 00 


8 00 


8 00 


i?f 


132 lbs. 


228 


346>2 


24" 


2 50 


10 00 


10 00 


10 00 


2 " 


175 lbs. 


172 


452j^ 


30" 


4 00 


16 00 


16 00 


16 00 


»#' 


260 lbs. 


Il6 


707 



Slants (for Brick Sewers) once and a half the price of Pipe per foot, measured on the long side. 
Split or half pipe three-fifths the price of whole pipe. 

SECOND QUALITY SEWER PIPE. 

Through the process of burning, some of the pipes are liable to blister, crack, lose their perfect 
form, or have defective sockets, which renders them unfit for city or private sewers, but for the 
drainage of 

Swamp Lands, Culverts for Railroads, Roadways, and Linings for Wells 

they answer the purpose, and can be bought at a much less price. 
Prices quoted upon application. 



DISCOUNT SHEET .... SEWER PIPE AND FITTINGS. 



Revised July 25, 1904. 



1st, quality 2nd. Quality 



Standard Sewer Pipe. •. . 3" to 18" 

" H " 20" to 24" 

" " " 30" 

Double Strength Sewer Pipe... 15" to 18" 
" " " "... 21" to 24" 
" " " "... 30" 

Grease Traps 



5( 
4( 
3( 



20# 



65g 
55< 
45# 



55< 
45$ 
25% 



Terms 60 days or 3 per cent, for cash. Packing extra. 



Cartage, ( 



( On shipments from Lincoln, Free. 



( On shipments from San Francisco or Oakland, 65^ per ton. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



Standard Patterns of Sewer Pipe and Fittings* 



Fig. 1. 



Fig. 2. 



Fig. 3. 



Fig. 8. 



■r H 



III 



Hliiill 



r 





Fig. 6. 

I 



wLM 



Fig. 7. 

no 

■f 

I; 

1J 



Fig. 5. 



Fig. 4. 




^ 



Fig. II. 



Fig. IO. 



Fig. 9. 






GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Grease Traps. 



Inside 

Diameter of 

Outlet 

3 inches 




Inside 

Diameter of 

Inlet 

3 inches 



NOTICE. — Use three inch pipe to connect grease traps -with the lateral sewers. 

PRICE LIST OF GREASE TRAPS. 



Number 


Price 


Inside Diameter 


Depth 


Capacity 


I 
2 


$4 oo 
5 oo 


12 inches 
16 inches 


13 inches 
18 inches 


3 gallons 
7 gallons 



The attention of Architects, Contractors, Masons, Plumbers and all persons who lay drains is 
called to the above device for preventing the fouling and obstruction of sewers and drains by the 
deposit of grease therein. 

The most common and certain cause of obstruction to house-drains arises from grease, which, 
though fluid when hot, soon cools in the drains, and gradually, but certainly closes them up. We 
have known drains thirty to fifty feet in length closed nearly the whole distance from this cause. 
The amount which will collect from the waste of a single family is surprising to those who are not 
familiar with the subject. It ordinarily causes much more expense and inconvenience to allow this 
substance to run into the drain than to catch it in a grease trap, from which it can conveniently be 
removed. 

This method of catching the grease keeps the sewer clean, and by not permitting it to enter the 
sewer, of course does away with the possibility of decomposition of this substance, thus disposing 
effectually of one of the most active agents in creating that poisonous SEWER GAS so dangerous 
to health. 

We earnestly recommend the use of the above trap in all drains leading from sinks in kitchens 
as it will be found thoroughly effective in its operation. 

N. B. — Place as near the kitchen sink as possible, so that there shall be the least practicable length 
of pipe to accumulate grease. 



They are made of the same material as our sewer pipe. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 

Sewerage. 

General Information on the Subject. 



Owing to the prevalence of malignant fevers, directly traceable to violations of sanitary laws, 
the public has begun to realize the necessity for thorough systems of sewerage and drainage, and is 
inquiring into the mode of obtaining the most satisfactory results. 

Fortunately a large amount of data is at hand to be drawn from, based upon the practical experi- 
ence of many years close and intelligent observation by eminent civil engineers, possessing special 
attributes for their work, and whose observations come to us officially embodied in exhaustive reports 
to boards of commissioners, city councils, state legislatures and national legislative bodies. 

The information to be derived from a careful perusal of all the literature on sanitary drainage 
would be of incalulable benefit to all, yet few have the time and fewer still the inclination to thor- 
oughly study this subject. 

Hence, we have condensed a few facts which we take the liberty of presenting to a thinking 
public. For further details, we refer our readers to such works as " Sewerage and Land Drainage," 
by Col. Geo. E. Waring; and "Sanitary Engineering," by Baldwin Latham, also Col. Waring's 
report on the sewerage system of Memphis, Tenn. 

Under the Mosaic law, a strict observance of sanitary laws was a part of their religious duty; 
but in time, "the people sank to the lowest depths of sanitary neglect, from which the powerful voices 
of typhus, plague and cholera were the first to arouse them." 

Impure air, produced by decomposing matter, or germs of disease, which abound in large cities 
or towns imperfectly drained, and found in a lesser degree in the country surrounding the same, 
poisons the blood effectually. 

Water having the power of drawing and absorbing the impurities from the air, may become 
freighted with the germs of disease. 

Your well drains the water from the surrounding earth a long distance. It is estimated that a 
well will drain five feet in all directions for every foot in depth, thus a well twenty leet deep will 
drain a space two hundred feet in diameter. 

Filth chemically mixed with water cannot be filtered from it, hence the danger of vaults and 
cesspools, from which the liquids are absorbed by the earth. Residence on a damp soil engenders 
consumption, while drainage ol that soil lessens it. 

The impurities from a vault, seeping into a well in a New York village, gave typhoid fever to 43 
persons, of whom 10 died. 

Impurities from a vault getting into the water pipes of Over Darwin. England, produced 2,035 
cases of typhoid lever, including 104 deaths. 

In London, in 1848-9. a single well, though yielding apparently clear, refreshing water, caused 
the death of 500 persons by cholera in one week, the water being impregnated with decomposing 
sewage. 

Fifty-six out oi 74 pupils in a young ladies' seminary at Pittslield. Mass., had typhoid and 16 
died. Cause, pollution of air and water from vaults and cellars improperly drained. 

There are very numerous similar rases on record, and how many where the cause was never 
before discovered ? 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



MATERIAL. 

Stone, brick, cement, wood and vitrified clay pipe have all been tested for years, and the merits 
and demerits of each are now so well understood, that we think it safe to say that the vitrified pipe is 
preferable to any other known material. 

Stone and brick are rough, as well as porous, and allow the poisonous liquids and gases to per- 
meate the ground surrounding them, infecting contiguous wells and streams. 

Cement pipe is quickly disintegrated by the action of the acids and alkalies always found in 
sewers, and cannot be relied upon, as is clearly proven by a large number of letters written by the 
most prominent engineers in various parts of the United States, to the City Engineer of St. Louis, 
in response to his request for their views and experience as to the comparative value of cement and 
vitrified stone pipe. (We have these letters in printed form, and will send a copy to any one inter- 
ested.) Wood is but short lived, and requires replacing every few years. 

A vitrified salt glazed pipe can never wear out, cannot be penetrated by acids or alkalies, is not 
affected by frost, and is the smoothest material known for sewers, by reason of which the friction is 
reduced to a minimum, and the capacity thereby increased over stone or brick, from thirty to fifty 
per cent. 

SIZE. 

The size of a sewer should be proportioned to the work it is expected to perform. 
A four-inch pipe, if well graded, will carry off all the rainfall — which is the measure of the largest 
demand upon it, of an ordinary city house and lot. A six-inch drain will serve the largest house. 

Old time sewers were built sufficiently large to be entered and 
cleaned out, almost regardless of the quantity they were expected to 
carry off; as it was taken as a matter of course they would frequently 
fill up with sediment from the flowing sewage, and so they did fill up 
in many cases, being built twice and three times as large as there was 
any necessity for. In such cases there is not only a useless expense 
"in construction, but the sewer will not begin to do the work as well as 
one of proper size. For example, suppose a stream four feet wide and 
two inches deep, on a slight grade the current would be very slow, 
and sediment would be deposited on the bottom of the sewer, perhaps 
finally choking it up. But contract the width to one foot, the current 
would then be eight inches deep, and the friction but one-fourth as 
much as before, and the velocity of the stream increased so greatly as 
to sweep everything before it, and make the sewer self-cleansing. 

The passion for too large sewers seems to be an almost universal 
one. The feeling is that it is best to make the conduit "big enough, 
anyhow," and as a result, nearly every drain that is laid, in town or 
country, is so much larger than is needful that the expense of keeping 
it clean is often the most serious item of cost connected with it. It 
cannot be too often reiterated, that the great purpose of modern water 
sewerage is to remove immediately, and entirely beyond the occupied 
portions of a town, all manner of domestic waste and filth before it 
has time to enter into decomposition; thus preventing an accumulation of dangerous matter and 
obviating the necessity of employing men in the unwholesome work of hand-cleaning cesspools 
and sewers of deposit, which all sewers are apt to become when materially too large for the work they 
have to perform. 

Again, too much allowance is frequently made for the accessions from lateral drains at various 
points between the beginning and outlet of the main sewer. It must be remembered that though a 
pipe may be full at the head, it may, by reason of increasing velocity of the stream, be but two-thirds 
full in the middle, and but half full at the mouth. Not only this, but these accessions, if by junctions 
at an obtuse angle, or Y, offer but little resistance, and are frequently found to increase the velocity, 
without swelling the sectional area. A right angle, or T junction, must necessarily offer more resist- 
ance: hence the Y should alwa)'s be used when practicable. 




Cross 9ection of a 3x5 foot brick 
sewer, filled by the gradual accu- 
mulation of silt until only sufficient 
water-way is left for the smallest 
constant (low. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 9 

After draining the subsoil where necessary, with drain tile, and taking care of the surface water 
as far as practicable, by gutters, etc., what remains, together with the sewage from houses, must be 
estimated to decide upon the necessary size of the sewer to be constructed. 

A large portion of the rainfall never reaches the drain, owing to evaporation, absorption, and 
various obstructions, and it is considered safe to estimate that not more than two-thirds of a given 
rain can reach the sewer within the hour it falls. 

In making estimates, the following facts should be borne in mind: — 

A smooth inner surface sewer offers much less resistance to the flow of water than a rough sur- 
face, and is much less liable to catch sediment or obstructions of any kind. 

The greater the inclination, the smaller the sewer need be. 

INCLINATION. 

All sewers should have the greatest possible fall or inclination; the greater the inclination the 
greater the velocity. In order to prevent deposit in sewers it is necessary to provide a certain 
velocity in the flow of sewage, which must be secured throughout the whole system of sewers, and 
such velocity must be sufficient to prevent the subsidence from the liquid of any matters in suspension, 
and also to move along the bed of the channel any solid deposits. 

In order to prevent deposits in sewers, the following velocities should be maintained : — 
For sewers of six to ten inches in diameter, a velocity of at least three feet per second is required. 
Sewers twelve to twenty-four inches in diameter require a velocity of two and a half feet per 
second; and in sewers of larger dimensions, in no case should the velocity be less than two feet per 
second. 

" The minimum velocity of two feet per second should be exceeded wherever possible." 
" There is a limit in the other direction which has not yet been determined. It is well recognized 
among sewerage engineers that the fall of a sewer may be too steep — that is, that it may cause the 
flow to be drawn out to a thread of a stream so small as to lack depth and force, in spite of its veloc- 
ity, to carry solid matters along." 

VENTILATION. 

Sewers should be ventilated to prevent an accumulation of sewer gas, which is liable to be forced 
into the houses by drafts of wind or other causes, if precautions are not taken to prevent it. 

For ventilating large street sewers, openings carried to the surface at intervals, are probably the 
best thing yet devised. 

For ventilating house drains, a pipe connecting with the sewer, and carried up through and above 
the highest point of the roof, with a fresh air inlet between the house and the sewer will obviate all 
danger. 

In order to efiecta constant movement and change of air in the pipes, two openings are required, 
an outlet and an inlet. The extension of the soil pipe through the roof affords an escape of the foul 
air generated in the sewer, by the decomposition of foul organic matter clinging to the inner surface of 
the pipes. In order to render harmless this matter undergoing putrefaction a constant introduction of 
pure air from the outside is absolutely necessary, and as the soil pipe is warmer (being in the he: 
than the fresh air pipe, located near the ground in front, the result is an almost constant upward 
current in the soil pipe. 

" What is known under the general term ' sewer gas ' is the emanation from waste matters under- 
going decomposition in the absence of free air and light and in the presence o! water, whether in a 
sewer, house drain, cesspool, vault, or a foul, wet and unvcntilatcd cellar. It frequently exists in the 
case of a detached country house, and is never absent from a town sewer, though it is possible in the 
case of these, by perfect ventilation, greatly to lessen its production, and so to dilute it as to prevent 
its doing serious harm." 

FLUSHING. 

No system of sewerage that is not kept clean by its own flow, or by daily flushing, can satisfy 
even moderate sanitary requirements. To depend on the occasional flushing ol inlrequent rains is 
not sufficient. It is often possible to pond sewerage in large flush-tanks in sufficient volume, to give 
a good cleansing to main sewers. 



10 GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



THE REQUIREMENTS OF A GOOD SEWER. 

i. It must be perfectly tight from one end to the other, so that all matters entering it shall 
surely be carried to its outlet, not a particle of impurity leaking through into the soil. 

2. It must have a continuous fall from the head to the outlet, in order that its contents may 
" keep moving,'' so that there shall be no halting to putrify by the way, and no depositing of silt that 
would endanger the channel. 

3. It must be perfectly ventilated, so that the poisonous gases that necessarily arise, even when 
decomposing matters are being carried along in water, shall be diluted with fresh air, and shall have 
such means of escape as will prevent them from forcing their way into houses through the traps in 
the house-drains. 

4. It must be provided with means for inspection and flushing. 

5. The branches by which it receives its supply should be so regulated as to admit nothing that 
will be liable to choke up the channel. 



THE DISCHARGING CAPACITY OF CIRCULAR PIPE SEWERS 
AT VARIOUS INCLINATIONS. 

IN CIBIC FEET PUR MINUTE. 

(There are 7.4S05 gallons in a cubic foot.) 



INCLINATION 



I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 

I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 
I in 1000, 



5°. 
60, 
70, 
8o, 
90. 
100, 
no, 
120, 

130, 
140, 

'5°, 
160, 

170. 
1 So, 
190, 
200, 
250, 
500, 
75°, 



or 
or 


105 
88 


or 
or 


75 
66 


or 


58 


or 
or 


52 

4 s 


or 


44 


or 


40 


or 


37 


or 


35 


or 


33 


1 -l 


31 


or 


29 


or 

or 


27 
26 


or 


21 


or 


10% 


or 
or 


7 
5X 



feel per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 
feel per mile 
feel per mile 
feet per mile 
feet per mile 



Size 

4 in. 



Size 
6 in. 



21.48 

19-73 
18.25 
16.94 
15-89! 

15. 02' 
14.23 

1353 

13.OI 
12. 4 S 
12.05 
I1.6l 
I I . 26 
IO.9I 
IO.56 
IO.36 



60.17 

54 68 

50-37 
46. S4 

44- 10 
4175 
39-59 
37 -S3 
36.46 
34-89 
33-71 
32.54 
3>-36 
30.38 

29.60 
28.81 
25.68 



123-5 
112. 7 
104.0 
97.02 

91 -44 
86. 55 
S2.36 
7S.52 
75.38 
72-59 
70.15 
67.71 
65.61 
61.52 
61.77 
60.03 
53 -4° 



Size 
10 in. 



Size Size 



214 
196 
182 
170 
160 
152 
144 
'37 
"32 
127 

122 
Il8 

i'5 
in 
10S 
105 

93 
64 



339 
3"° 
2S7 
268 
252 
240 
228 
21S 
209 
201 
194 
1S8 
182 
176 
i/i 
■67 
148 
102 



474 
434 
401 

375 
352 
336 
3'9 
3°5 
292 
281 
271 
263 
254 
246 
240 

233 
207 

'43 
"5 



Size 
is in. 



590 
540 
501 
469 
442 
420 
400 
3*3 
367 
353 
341 
33° 
320 

31° 

302 

293 
261 

1 So 

144 



Size 

16 in. 



663 
607 
561 

525 
492 
470 



2S9 
2O0 
160 



Size 
18 in. 



927 
849 
788 
738 
696 
660 



446 O30 
427 604 
408 579 
393 I 55 s 
379 540 
36S I 523 
355 507 
344 491 
336 477 
326 4(14 



413 
286 
229 



Size 

20 in. 



Size 
22 in. 



859 
820 
7S5 
755 
72S 
702 
680 
661 
641 
624 
606 
539 
375 
301 

257 



1090 

1043 

997 

958 

924 
S92 
865 
836 

813 

792 

770 
686 

477 
3S2 

327 



Size 
24 in. 



Size 
30 ill. 



■357 

129S 

1 241 

1 191 

1 147 

1 109 

1075 

1043 

1012 
9S3 
95S 1679 
S54 1497 
593 ' 46 



477 
408 



S44 
722 



TABLE 
Showing the Pressure of Water at Different Elevations. 



Head 
Feel 



5 
10 

■5 
20 

25 



Pressure 

Pounds 
Sq inch 



43 
2.16 

433 
6.50 
8 67 
10. S3 



Head 
Feet 



30 

35 
40 

45 
5° 
55 



Pressure 
Pounds 
Sq. inch 



I3.OO 
15.17 
1734 
19.50 
21 67 
23.84 



Head 
Feet 



60 
65 
7° 
75 
So 

85 



Pressure 
Pounds 
Sq. inch 



26 01 
28.17 
3°-34 
32 51 
34. 6S 
36.84 



90 

95 
100 
105 
no 
115 



Pressure 
Pounds 
Sq. inch 



39-01 
41.18 

43 35 
45 5i 
47-68 
49 85 



Head 
Feet 



120 
125 
130 

135 
140 

145 



Pressure 
Pounds 
Sq. inch 



52.02 

54 18 
56 35 
5S.52 
60 69 
62.85 



Head 
Feet 



150 
160 
170 
180 
190 
200 



Pressure 
Pounds 
Sq. inch 



65.02 
69.36 
73-69 

78. 03 
82 36 
86.70 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 11 

A LEGAL INCH OF WATER, 

At present in California, is the water discharged through an opening one inch square, under a pres- 
sure of four inches from the center of the orifice to the top of the water above such orifice, and with 
a free discharge below. The water flowing through such an orifice is equivalent to 0.02 of a cubic 
foot per second; 1.2 cubic feet per minute; 72 cubic feet per hour, or 1,728 cubic feet per 24 hours, 
which in water measurement is called one day. To reduce this to gallons multiply by 7.4S, which 
gives 0.1496 gallons per second, 8.976 gallons per minute, 538.56 gallons per hour, or 12,925.44 gal- 
lons per day of 24 hours. As all water measures are first figured in cubic feet per second, and then 
reduced to legal miner's inches, it is convenient to know that one cubic foot per second equals fifty 
legal miner's inches. 

A MINER'S INCH OF WATER 

Is a very indefinite term, and has caused many disputes, as different localities have adopted different 
heights from the center of orifice to the top of the water, varying from three to eight inches. The 
great hydraulic companies, however, have agreed upon a six-inch pressure, which gives by actual 
measurement, as made by Hamilton Smith, at the North Bloomfield, 2260.6 cubic feet per twenty- 
four hours, or 94.2 cubic feet per hour. In reducing to inches the water stored in reservoirs, the 
practice is to allow 100 cubic feet per hour. For irrigating heads the pressure runs all the way from 
three to eight inches among commercial ditches. The latter is, or was recently, in use by the 
National Canal Company, Sacramento county. That company measures through an orifice four 
inches deep, with six inches additional to overflow. In regard to the measuring box, the practice is 
quite uniform. It should be so large that the inflow will not create a perceptible current or commo- 
tion. The opening is usually two inches in depth; its length being regulated by a tight-fitting 
slide, each half-inch being equivalent to an inch of water. The edges are smooth, and if necessary 
are chamfered on the outside. This system of measurement was first introduced in California by a 
Mr. John Dunn in January, 1851. 

WATER CONSUMED IN CITIES AND TOWNS. 

According to the report of various cities for 1882, the following was the number of gallons used 
per capita per diem in each: 

Boston 99 gallons to each individual daily. 

Chicago 1 14 

Detroit.. 149 " 

Philadelphia 66 " 

New York 79 " 

Washington 176 " - " 

Mr. Fanning, authority upon water supply, gives the following as the approximate consumption 
of water in American cities: — 

a. For ordinary domestic use (not including hose), twenty gallons per capita per day. 

b. For private stables, including carriage washing, when reckoned on the basis of inhabitants, 
three gallons per capita per day. 

c. For commercial and manufacturing purposes, five to fifteen gallons per capita per day. 

d. For fountains — drinking and ornamental — three to ten gallons per capita per day. 
c. For fire purposes, one to ten gallons per capita per day. 

f. For private hose, sprinkling streets and yards, ten gallons per capita per day during the four 
driest months of the year. 

g. Waste, to prevent freezing of water in service pipes, and house fixtures in Northern cities, 
ten gallons per capita per day during the three coldest months of the year. 

h. Waste by leakage of pipes and fixtures and use for flushing purposes, from five gallons per 
capita per day upward 

Finally, Mr. Fanning gives the following .is the approximate estimate of the average daily con- 
sumption, basing his calculations entirely upon the population: — 

Places of 10,000 population. 35 to 45 gallons per capita. 
Places of 20,000 population, 40 to 50 gallons per capita. 
Places of 30,000 population. 45 to 6j gallons per capita. 
Places o\ 50,000 population, 55 to 75 gallons per capita. 
Places of 75.000 and upwards, 60 to 100 gallons per capita. 

This estimate corresponds with the estimates made by other authorities on the subject of water 
Supply. It will be seen from this, that, while an average of fifty gallons per capita per day is the 
requirement of a water supply, only twenty gallons per capita per day are required lor the ordinary 
domestic purposes. The other thirty gallons may be regarded as necessary to supply the demands 
of luxury or business necessity. 



12 GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Intermittent Flush-Tanks* 

Directions for Building. 

The discharging limb of each siphon should be set in a vertical position, and the earth and 
concrete thoroughly consolidated about the siphon. In building the tank great care should be 
exercised to make it water tight, by being thoroughly plastered both inside and out. Nothing but 
the best hydraulic cement (Portland if possible i should be used. The feed pipe should be brought 
into the tank at sufficient depth below the ground to keep it from freezing and it should be turned up 
free of the wall inside the tank. It is best to provide a small pet cock lor the regular supply, and a 
large cock for special use, by which to fill the tank rapidly. Tanks should be provided with a tight- 
fitting cover, and should be connected with the sewer above the water line to keep them Irom freezing. 

This upper connection with the sewer should be put in full size of sewer in such manner as to 
answer for inspection purposes. 

Details for erection will be furnished upon application. 

TESTIMONIALS. 

Pasadena, CAL.,June 18, 1900. 
In reply to your inquiry of recent date, I am pleased to state that we have used the Miller Flush Tank in 
Pasadena for a period of ten years, and find them all they are recommended to be, and think the simplicity of the 
device should insure its finding favor with all Civil Engineers. The tanks in Pasadena have all been in continuous 
operation since being installed and promise to last a good many years to come. 

[Signed) W. B. Ci.app, 

City Engineer. 

Spokane, Wash., June 21, 1S97. 
In reply to your inquiry of the 14th inst., I would say that the Miller Automatic Siphons, both Standard and 
Special Design, placed in the sewers of Spokane the past year, have given such perfect satisfaction that none but 
the Miller are now specified in our new work. This season I expect to replace with Miller's quite a number of our 
old siphons which have given more or less trouble in the past. 

(Signed) Otto A. YV'eu.e, 

City Engineer. 

Phcenix, Ariz., Sept. 11, 1S99. 
Replying to yours of the 17th of August shall say, this Company has 18 of your (Miller) Siphons in its system 
and that they have always done their work satisfactorily since I have been with the Company, a period of five years. 

(Signed) W. A. Farish, 

City Engineer. 

Also Engineer to Artz?na Water Works and Sewerage Coin/iany. 

Salt Lake Citv, Utah, Dec. 14, 1897. 
Flushing with the hose is not satisfactory for the reason that it is expensive, and owing to the time it takes to 
get over the system the laterals are not Hushed often enough to keep them clean. The laterals flushed by siphons 
are in much better condition than those flushed with the hose. The Miller Automatic Siphons that we have put 
in are giving entire satisfaction, and in my opinion they are the most efficient siphons used. 

(Signed) F. C. Kelsev, 

City Engineer. 

Tampa, Florida, June 15, 1900. 
Yours of the 12th inst. at hand and in reply to the same shall state that we have in operation 30 of your Rhoads- 
Williams Siphons and that thev give perfect satisfaction. Have never seen tanks work better. 

(Signed) F. T. Warren, 
Chief Engineer. 

Kansas Citv, Mo., May 12, 1900. 
Replying to yours of the 7th inst., shall state, that the forty-five Miller Siphons furnished by your company for 
the Westport sewer system were thoroughly inspected a few days since and all found to be in excellent working 
order with the exception of three, which had never been connected with the water mains. 

Although erected in 1895-96 these flush tanks have never had One Dollar's worth of repairs put on them — in 
fact, not much attention has ever been paid them. 

I consider this record an excellent testimonial of the efficiency of your Miller Siphons. 

(Signed) Henry A. Wise, 

City Engineer. 

Charleston, S. C, May 11, 1900. 
Five years ago I took the opportunity of writing to you on the merits of the Miller Automatic Siphon in use in 
the City of Charleston on the sewer system. 

They were pronounced in a few words as "simple, quick and sure in operation" and to-day I can find no 
reason to retract the statement. From personal inspection I find them to be regular and to give entire satisfaction. 

(Signed) R. B. Olnev, 

Supt. of Sewers. 

Atlanta, Ga, Dec. 20, 1895. 
After a wide experience, during which I have thoroughly tested all the "Standard" Siphons, I have no hesi- 
tancy in saying that the "Miller" is the best. It is simple in construction, certain in its action and has all the 
elements of durability. (Signed) R. F. Hartford, 

Consulting Engineer. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 13 

The Miller Automatic Siphon Flush -Tank. 

Invented and Patented by Sidney W. Miller. 

This Siphon, as shown by the accompanying illustration, consists of but two parts; the discharg- 
ing limb or deep-seal trap (with the discharge mouth integral therewith), and the intaking limb or 
bell, which is placed over the longer leg of the Siphon and held securely in place by its own weight, 
both parts being plain castings with no machine work whatever. 

This Siphon has no moving parts to get out of order, no joints to leak and no small tubes to 
clog up or choke, and is universally acknowledged to be the simplest and most durable device of its 
kind ever made. 

It received the highest award in its class at the World's Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893, 
for simplicity of construction, efficiency and reliability. 




TABLE OF DIMENSIONS WITH PRICES. 





SltB and Capacity 0* TANKS 


Water Price P. B. 

required to nil >:m Pnnciaco 
loo lineal leet for Siphons ol 
»er standard 
Cubic Feel Length 


of 

Siphon 

Inches 


ot 
Sewer Diameter 
Inches Feet 


Discharging Discharging 
Depth Capacity 
Inches Cubic Feet 


5 

6 
8 


6-8 4 
8-10 4 1 .- 
12-15 5 


25 *5 
34 4? 
39 


20-35 OO 

35-55 35 00 

■: 22 50 OO 



TABLE OF RATES OF DISCHARGE. 
5 inch Miller Siphon discharges 0.65 cubic feet, or 5 gallons per second. 



1. 00 
; 2 



/ - 



14 GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



The Rhoads -Williams Automatic Siphon Flush -Tank. 

Invented and Patented by Win. G. Rhoads and Benezctte Williams. 

As will be seen by accompanying illustration, this Siphon consists of an intaking limb or bell 
with vent tube attached, and a discharging limb or deep-seal trap with a blow-off or relief trap cast 
integral therewith. The Siphon is brought into action by the confined air within the Siphon being 
released through this blow-off trap, which has a less depth of seal than the main trap. 

Up to the time of the introduction of the Miller Siphon on the market, the Rhoads-Williams 
was the leading Siphon in the country, and to-day is as near perfection as it is possible for any 
Siphon to be that depends upon a subsidiary device for its operation. 




TABLE OF DIMENSIONS WITH PRICES. 



! 'ia meter of 


Diameter of 
Sewer 
Inches 


SIZE and Capacity of tanks, with siphons op 
Standard Length 


Water required 

to fill 

ion Lineal Feet 

ol Sewer 

Cubic Feet 


Price F. 0. n. 
San Francisco 


Discharging 
Limb 

Inches 


Diameter Discharging 

Feet '*P lh 
Inches 


Discharging 

Capacity 
Cubic Feet 

27 
40 
59 
85 
128 


for Siphons of 

Standard 

Length 


5 

6 

8 

io 

12 


6 

8 

io 

12 

15 


4 

5 
6 

7 


26 
3' 
36 
36 
40 


20 
35 

55 

79 

122 


f30 OO 

35 00 

50 OO 

75 00 
100 00 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



15 



Vitrified Salt Glazed 




(For Prices see Page 4.) 

We manufacture this pipe expressly for the purpose of conducting water, where the pressure is 
not greater than a head of twenty-five feet. It has come into extensive use for that purpose within 
the past few years, and in a great measure is taking the place of iron pipe, on account of its 
reasonable cost and non-liability to corrode, or be affected by alkali or mineral waters. 

The pipe is made in two-foot lengths, with sockets, and out of the best prepared stone-ware clay, 
and pressed into shape by powerful machinery. The pipe is made very compact, and is thoroughly 
vitrified by being fired at a high temperature. 

In laying this pipe the ends of each length must abut squarely and truly together, so that the 
annular space between the spigot and socket ends of the pipe will be the same at all parts of its circle. 

This annular space must be completely and thoroughly filled with a mortar made of the best Eng- 
lish Portland cement, and clean, sharp sand (free from loam or pebbles), mixed in equal parts and 
used as soon as mixed. From eight to ten days' time should be allowed for the cement to thor- 
oughly harden before the pipe is covered or water is allowed to pass through it. 

Water should not be turned off at the outlet, but at the inlet or point of supply. 

Place on the line of pipe stand pipes, with movable caps, so that they can be used, when desired, 
as air escapes. 

If our directions are strictly adhered to the Pipe will stand a head of at least twenty-five feet. 



Well Tubing. 

( For Prices see Page 4.) 



"Without 
Sockets 



Within the past few years Vitrified Pipes have come into very general use for 
tubing bored wells, and they are certainly the cleanest and most durable materials ever 
used for that purpose. Where there is no stone to obstruct the boring, wells can be 
easily and cheaply made, with augers similar to post augers, constructed for the pur- 
pose, and such wells, when lined with this stone-ware tubing, are superior to any others 
in point ol cleanliness and durability. 

For this use the sections are sometimes made without sockets, so as to fit the hole 
more closely, but the regular socket joint is by far the best, as this makes a more solid 
joint, each piece fitting accurately into the end of the next, thus forming a con- 
tinuous tube, leaving no crevice for the dirt to fall in, doing away with the necessity of 
cleaning the well. Vermin cannot crawl through the joints, hence, sweet, pure water 
is the result. 

Dug wells arc curbed with the larger sizes and are far superior to a curbing ol" 
brick or stone, especially in sandy ground, where common wells are easily made, and 
when made are constantly filling up with quicksand; but with these pipes a well can be put down 
with ease, even in a bank of quicksand. This is best done by a man getting inside the pipe, and as 
he throws out the sand the pipes settle down by their own weight. When the first pipe gets below 
the surface put on another, and so continue to do until the required depth is reached. 



16 GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Culvert Pipe. 

( For Prices see Page 4.) 

Vitrified pipes are extensively used for railroad culverts, and have been for the last thirty years, 
and we desire to call the attention of supervisors and county road commissioners throughout the 
country, to the use of these pipes for culverts across common roads, in place of small plank bridges 
and box culverts, so commonly used, and which are constantly getting out of repair, and last at most 
but a few years; whereas a vitrified pipe culvert, if well put in, will last for ages without repairs, and 
will prove cheapest as well as the best in the long run. 

The construction of a pipe culvert is a very simple matter, but should nevertheless be done with 
care. If the top of the pipe, when laid, is less than two feet below the surface of the road-bed, first 
cover the pipes with dirt to the depth of a few inches and level it off, then place a few poles, fence 
rails or planks over the pipes lengthwise, and throw on more dirt and grade up to the level of the 
road-bed. The rails or poles will serve to equalize the pressure on the pipes when the wheels ot 
heavy wagons pass over them; but if the dirt is two feet deep or more no other protection is neces- 
sary. The ends of the culvert should be protected by small abutments of stone or plank (as shown), 
otherwise the end pipes \vould be liable to be undermined by the action of the water, or displaced by 
thirsty hogs in search of water to drink or wallow in. The size of pipe required in each particular 
case depends of course upon the amount of water to be provided for, and this depends upon the area 
of ground from which the rainfall runs to the culvert. This area can generally be estimated with 
sufficient accuracy, by careful observation, without surveying instruments, and the size required can 
then be determined by reference to tables on the previous pages. When there is any doubt as to the 
proper size it is better, of course, to put in one larger than is necessary rather than too small. 

We received calls for pipes as small as six inches for this purpose, but the sizes most used range 
from 8 to 18 inches for turnpikes, wagon roads, farm culverts and street crossings, and from 12 to 30 
inches for railroads. Our second-quality pipe is well adapted for this purpose. 



Fig. 12. 



Fig. 13. 





Figure 12 shows the end of a pipe culvert, protected by a small abutment of stone or brick. The 
foundation should of course extend far enough down into the ground to be below the influence ol 
frost, as otherwise the alternate heaving and settling might throw the end pipe out of position. When 
stone or brick abutments are too expensive, a good and cheap substitute can be made of planks, by 
setting them on end, deep enough in the ground to hold them in place, and fitting them closely about 
the pipe; or still better by setting a post each side of the pipe (see Fig. 13), and by spiking the planks 
on horizontally, as represented above. 

When planks or posts are used it is best to set them with considerable inclination toward the 
road-bed to prevent the pressure of the embankment from crowding the planks outward. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 17 



DESCRIPTION. 

Your attention is called to our Vitrified Tile, which are extensively used on this coast for the 
Drainage or Sub-Irrigation of lands. 

Our Tile are manufactured without sockets or collars, in one foot lengths, and are laid in the 
trench with their ends joined as closely as possible. If to be used for Drainage, the water will 
enter where the ends of the tile meet, and if for Irrigation, it will escape at the same points. 

We take it for granted that a few suggestions as to the form and quality of tile best suited to the 
purpose may not be out of place. First as to form — the round tiles are undoubtedly the best, because 
they can be laid any side up, and thus a close joint can be secured with much less trouble than with 
flat bottom or horse shoe tile, especially if a little out of shape. 

As to quality, tile should be made of good fire-clay, and hard burned — the more like stone-ware 
the better. Such tile are of unusual strength, which materially reduces the breakage and expense of 
transportation. 

Too much stress cannot be laid upon the importance of using hard burnt tile only, as the failure 
of a single tile may work extensive mischief. 

Tile should be smooth on the inside, as the friction will be less. 

The old-fashioned notion that drain tile should be porous in order to absorb the water was an 
error. The water enters the drain at the joints, and nowhere else to any appreciable extent. 

The tile made of common brick clay at various places throughout the country is a good deal 
better than nothing; but when good, solid, hard burned tile made of fire-clay, can be obtained at 
about the same price, it is a great mistake to use the soft porous tile. The farmer cannot afford to 
use inferior tile; he wants only what is reliable, and will be of permanent value. 

WE CLAIM ALL THE ABOVE ADVANTAGES FOR OUR TILE. 

PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS FOR THE LAYING OF TILE DRAINS. 

In the beginning of drainage the work should be carefully laid out, the inclination marked on 
grade stakes, and the whole should be platted and carefully preserved for future reference. If it is 
not possible to complete the work soon, let it be so done as to look forward to the time when it shall 
be completed. 

In laying a tile drain, it is well to strictly adhere to the following rules: — 

1. The drain should have a sufficient outlet for the discharge of all the water that may pass 
through it. 

2. The drain should be deep enough to drain the widest space possible — from three to four feet 
— and deeper, if necessary to get the water out by a much shorter line; but drain any way, even if 
you cannot get an outlet to drain so deep. 

3. The bottom of the drain should be one regular line of descent, so that the current may have 
a smooth flow from the head to the mouth of the drain. 

4. Every tile should be perfect in form and well burned, having a clear metallic ring. 

5. In laving the tile, take pains to fit the joints closely, as with all care there will be sufficient 
space for the inlet of the water, and close joints will prevent the letting in of silt or washings. 

6. At the junction of drains the water should be brought together, flowing as nearly as possible 
in the same direction, so that the flow of the current may not be obstructed. 

7. Place a coarse sieve, or something of that kind, across the outlet, to prevent rats or snakes 
hum crawling in. 

8. The size of the tile may be pretty accurately determined by the amount of surface to be 
drained and the descent of the drain, by reference to the tables on page 19. 

9. At the point where the work ceases for the time, secure and note the same, that the work 
may be readily taken up at any future time. 



18 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



10. If the drains be laid at a distance of 40 feet apart, 1,060 feet of tile are required to lay one 
acre; if at a distance of 50 feet apart, 860 feet will be required, and at a distance of 60 feet apart, 750 
feet. 

11. Smaller tile than three inches in diameter should not be used, and drains constructed with 
tile of that size should not exceed one thousand feet in length. 




THE EFFECTS OF DRAINAGE. 

Drought. — " It is often asked, ' If draining makes a soil dry in a wet year, will it not make it 
too dry in a dry time ? ' It has been shown that a drained soil holds a large quantity of moisture by 
absorption. The soil being very much deepened, the roots of plants have access to the moisture 
contained in a much larger mass of soil than when undrained. Again, a soil is filled with capillary 
tubes, which carry moisture to the surface, where it is quickly converted into vapor. If the surface 
is mellow and the whole depth of soil loose, the tubes are much larger, so that water is conveyed to 
the surface in much less quantities. Consequently less moisture is lost by evaporation. Still further, 
in dry times the soil below the surface is much cooler than the air, hence when air containing vapor 
is brought in contact with it, the vapor is condensed into water and absorbed by the particles of soil. 
In an undrained soil the surface is made compact by standing water, is baked by the sun when the 
water is evaporated, is compact below, giving little depth of soil for the plants. Moisture evaporates 
rapidly through the hard surface, and roots, having a comparatively small range, soon feel the ill 
effects of dry weather. Some soils are naturally very rich and porous, producing good crops when 
the spring rains are light enough to allow the soil to be worked, but it has been found that such soil 
produces much larger crops even in dry times when well drained. In short, thorough under-draining 
has been found to be a most efficient preventive of drought. It also makes a better tillage possible, 
which in itself is a great advantage, and it makes all parts of the soil available for the use of useful 
crops." 



f! 




rain Tile and Fittings. 




% 



PRICE LIST. 



Inside Diameter 
of Tile 



2 inch. 

3 inch. 

4 inch. 

5 inch. 

6 inch. 
8 inch. 

10 inch. 
12 inch. 



Price of Tile 


Price of 


Price of 


Price of 


Weight of Tile 


Feet toCarload 


per 1,000 feet 


Brandies eacli 


Curves each 


Reducers each 


per Foot 


of 15 tons 


$25 OO 


$° 25 


$0 25 


$0 25 


2^ lbs. 


I2.OO0 


30 OO 


35 


35 


35 


3% lbs. 


8,600 


40 CO 


40 


40 


40 


VA lbs. 


5,4DO 


60 OO 


50 


5° 


5° 


8 lbs. 


3,75° 


90 OO 


60 


60 


60 


10 lbs. 


3.000 


150 OO 


75 


75 


75 


18 lbs. 


1,670 


250 OO 


1 00 


I OO 


I OO 


21 lbs. 


' 43° 


300 OO 


1 25 


I 25 


I 25 


29 lbs. 


1,040 



DISCOUNT SHEJW... DRAIN TILE. 



Revised July 25, 1904. 



( F. 0. B. cars at Lincoln.... 30$ 

Drain Tile( 

{ In warehouse at San Francisco or Oakland 10$ 



Terms 60 days or 3 per cent, for cash. Packing extra. 

( On shipments from Lincoln, Free. 
Cartage, ( 

( On shipmnets from San Francisco or Oakland, 65j^ per ton. 






' 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 19 

Capacity of Drain Tile. 

The following table may be found convenient for reference by those who are considering the 
subject of drainage : — 

Number of Acres which Tiles of the following Sizes and Inclinations will Drain when the 
Rainfall does not exceed Half an Inch in Twenty-four Hours. 



INCLINATION 



foot in 



10 feet 
20 



25 

30 

40 

50 

60 

70 

80 

90 

100 

150 

200 

250 

300 

400 

500 

600 

800 

1,000 

1,500 

2, coo 



2 Inch 
Tile 



6 
4 

4 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
1.6 



3 Inch 
lile 



I8.9 

13- 
II. 4 
IO.9 

9.4 
8.4 

7 6 
6.9 

6-5 
6.1 

5-7 
4-5 
3-9 
3-5 



4 Inch 
Tile 



26.8 
24. 
21 .9 

'9- 

17- 

15.6 

14-5 

13-4 

12.6 

11. 9 

9-5 
8.2 

7-5 
6.9 
5-9 
5 3 
4.8 

4i 



5 Inch 
Tile 



47-2 
44-4 
41.2 
36., 

30-4 
29 1 
26.5 
23.6 



23 
21 

19 
'5 
13 
1 j 
10 

9 

9- 

7.6 

-7 



6 Inch X Inch 

Tile Tile 



66.2 

6.. 5 

53 

47 

43 

39 

37 

35- 

33- 1 

26.6 

22.8 
20.4 
is. 4 
.6.5 
14.8 

'3-3 

11. 4 

10. 2 

8.7 



126 4 

109.6 

98. 

90. 

«3- 

77 

72 -5 

69.2 

56. 

48 

43 ■ 4 
38.2 

.! 6 

30.1 

28. 

24 

21.2 
I/.6 



jo Inch 12 Inch 

Tile Tile 



I9O.5 
I7O.4 
■56. 

■44-4 

'35- 

127. 

120.6 
97-3 
839 
74-4 
65-5 
60.3 

54 

48.6 

41.9 

37 • - 
30.8 
27. 



269. 
246. 
228.1 

213- 

200.5 

190.5 

'54 4 

1325 

"7 

107. 

90.7 

81 6 

74 

65. 

56. 

47- 

40 8 



xi »TK. ' >ne acre covered with water one-hall inch in depth, is equivalent t<> 1 Bi 5 cubic feel •■[ n.v; gallons. The capacity 
of the tile can be expressed in cubic feel or gallons by multiplying the number of acres drained by either 1,815 Or I 



Table Showing the Quantity of Rainfall per Acre. 



Inches in Depth 


Cubic Feet 


Gallons 


Inches in ltepth 


Cubic Feet 


Gallons 


of Rain 


Per Acre 


Per Acre 


of Rain 


Per Acre 


Per Acre 


.1 


363 


2,715 


.6 


2,178 


16.292 




15 


544'- 


4.°73 


■65 


2.359'-- 


I7.63O 




2 


7 26 


5.430 


■7 


2,541 


19,007 




25 


907 ' 5 


6,788 


•75 


; - ; ;• ' _■ 


20.: 




3 


1,089 


S.14H 


.8 


2,904 


21,7 




35 


1,271 




•85 


; 


08l 




4 


1,452 


IO,86l 


•9 




*4 • 




45 


1.0; 


12,219 


•95 


3.4- 


-96 




5 


1,815 


13.577 


1.0 


3630 


27.>54 




55 


1 , 996 ' i 


14.934 









20 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Acid Receivers, Crocks and Fittings* 








Xo. yyj .\ Add Cock 







► 31 




We show on this page a few of the shapes of Acid Fittings that we make. If you desire further 
information, send for our blue print sheets Nos. 346, 347, 348 and 349, showing about one hundred 
and twenty-five shapes and sizes of fittings and plates that we can make at short notice. 

Prices quoted upon application. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



IMPERISHABLE 



Laundry Tubs 



AND 



Kitchen Sinks 



These Tubs and Sinks are carefully made, of selected Clays, 
and glazed in light yellow. 

They are seamless, clean, non-absorbent, and more durable 
than iron. 

The "Placer" Laundry Tubs. 




Please paste this revised list over the prices on page 21 of our catalogue No. 30. 
DECEMBER 2CMH. 1005. GLADDING. McBEAN CO, CO. 

No. 1005. 

Length Outside *s 

Width 1 )utside 22% in 

Depth Inside 13 in 

Price 0! i >nc tray w it hunt fittings - 

Mine Wringer Attachment with Molt . , .... «.«.•■ 

. / I "i each Irav when placed in - 

Painted Iron Let; with Bar \ 

...,,,,.,. . of two or more 

Nickel-plated Coupling with RuMht Stopper 1 

s and Crating 7,5 cents each — 50 cents rebate ior empty crates returned uith ■ 



22 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



The "Lincoln" Flat Rim Laundry Tubs. 




Please paste this revised list over the prices on page 22 of our catalogue No. 30. 
DECEMBER 20th, 1905. GLADDING, McBEAN O, CO. 

No. J 000. 

Length Outside jo 

Width Outside 2H 

Depth Inside i ^ 

Price of one tray without fittings 

Ash Frame with Bolts j r- , - r , , . . 

,)•,,..,„ f ror each Iray "hen placed m sets 

Painted Iron Leg with Bar > ' ' 

Nickel-plated Coupling with Rubber Stopper \ of two or more 

* If the Ash Frame is omitted and a Wringer Attachment substituted, deduct $2.50 from this amount 
Crates and Crating 75 cents each — 50 cents rebate for empty crates returned with charges prepaid. 



inches 

inches 
inches 
512.50 

: 8. 5 o 




Please paste this revised list over the prices on page 22 of our catalogue No. 30. 
DECEMBER. 20th, 1905. GLADDING, McBEAN ®, CO. 

No. 1010. 

Length Outside 3 1 inches 

Width < lutside 25 inches 

Depth Inside '5 inches 

Price of one tray without fittings $15.00 

Ash Wringer Attachment with Bolt ^ Fo] . each T ,„ v when p|aC( , d in sets 

Painted Iron Leg with Bar , - 

..■,,,, r- 1 - t i r> 1 1 V °f two or more b.oo 

Nickel-plated Coupling with Rubber stopper 1 

Crates and Crating 75 cents each — 50 cents rebate for empty crates returned with charges prepaid. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



23 



The "Lincoln" Flat Rim Kitchen Sinks. 




Please paste this revised list over the prices on page 23 of our catalogue No. 30. 

DECEMBER 20th, 1Q05- GLADDING, HcBEAN fa, CO. 



width Outside. 
20 ill. 



No. 1020. 

Depth Inside. 

7 in. 



Size. Length Outside 

No. I 30 in. 

No. 2 " 36 in, 23 iii. 7 in 

* If the Ash Frame is omitted and Roll Rim Legs (No [030) art used, deduct S3 50 from these prices. 
Crates and Crating 75 cents each — 50 cents rebate for empty crates returned « ith 1 harges prepaid, 



Ash Frame, Painted lion t.egs and Bracket*. 
Price Each with Nickel-plated strainer and Coupling. 
5 8. 51 1 :: Si 0.00 

1 1. 00 * 10.00 



The "Lincoln" Roll Rim Kitchen Sinks. 




Please paste this revised list over the prices on page 23 of our catalogue No. SO. 

GLADDING. McBEAN OX CO. 



DECEMBER 20«h, 1Q05- 



No, 

No 2 



Length ' mt*ide. 

31 '.' in. 

in. 



Width Otllsid 

:o' : in. 



No. 1030. 
Depth I 



Crates and Crating 73 cents each- 



Paiuf 

i 

- k , cen 1 empty crates returned with charges prepaid. 



24 GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe. 

We take pleasure in introducing our improved Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe. They have come 
into very general use within the last few years, especially where bricks are not plenty or cheap, and 
they have given entire satisfaction. Among the advantages are : 

ist. They are made of the best prepared Fire Clay, a portion of which is calcined, and they 
do not contract and expand by heat and cold, thus making the most durable and perfect chimney 
flue known. 

2d. They are cheaper than brick. 

3d. They are smooth, and soot does not stick to them, as in the case with brick flues. In fact, 
pipes make a more perfect chimney than bricks, a smooth round bore being the best possible form 
for a smoke flue. 

4th. They are safer than brick flues. By referring to the illustration it will be seen that by 
filling the socket with cement, it will form a solid flue from starting point to roof. They do not 
require a mechanic to put them up, but can be erected by a person of ordinary intelligence. Care 
should be taken to fill the socket with cement or mortar, as upon thai depends its safety. They are 
very much lighter than brick (weight of six-inch pipe is only twenty pounds per foot) and can be 
started on a bracket at any point. All lengths are made two feet, unless otherwise ordered. 







PRICE LIST. 



Caliber 

or 

Pipe. 


Price of Pipe 

per foot 

with or without 

Sockets. 


Openings 
or T's 
Each. 


Bottom Pipe 
Each. 


PMbows 
Each. 


Offsets 
Kacb. 


Weight of Pipe 
per Foot. 


5 inch 


25 cents 


$I.OO 


$I.OO 


$°-75 


$'•25 


15 lbs. 


6 " 


30 " 


I.20 


1.20 


1. 00 


I.50 


20 lbs. 


8 " 


40 


I.60 


I.60 


1.50 


2.00 


25 lbs. 



Note. — Our Chimney Pipe. Openings and Bottom Pipes are furnished in two-foot lengths. 
Shorter or longer lengths (up to four feet), and larger sizes can be furnished on short notice. 
See cut of an Elbow, Fig. 4, page 5. 



DISCOUNT SHEET. 

" " " ' '' Revised July 25, 1904. 

TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY PIPE AND P ITTINGS, FLUE LININGS. 

Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe and Fittings AQffo 

Flue Linings 40> 



Terms 60 days or 3 per cent, for cash. Packing extra. 



Cartage, ( 



( On shipments from Lincoln, Free. 



( On shipments from San Francisco or Oakland, 65j^ per ton. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 35 

Terra Cotta Flue Linings. 

The smoke flues of all first-class buildings recently erected are lined with terra cotta flue linings. 
A brick chimney, as ordinarily constructed, has on the inside a thin coating of lime mortar to make 
it smooth. In a few years the action of the heat and gases from coal causes the mortar lining and 
mortar in the joints to fall off, especially when the soot in the chimney burns out, then there remains 
a small opening in the brick work, through which there is always a draught. The heat from the 
chimney passes through this hole, and sets fire to the adjacent wood work. This is the origin of fires 
from defective flues, from which cause not less than twenty-five per cent, of our fires occur. 

Our flue linings are made of the best prepared fire clay. They do not rust, decay, crack or burn 
out, are non-conductors of heat, make a smooth, continuous flue with good draught, and obviate the 
danger caused by defective flues. 

Insurance companies recognize the additional safety secured by the use of these flue linings, by 
insuring buildings thus protected at lower rates than they otherwise would. Several cities have 
ordinances compelling their use in all new buildings, and there can be little doubt that such a policy 
will become general as soon as their utility shall become generally understood. 






PRICE LIST. 



Inside Measure. 

5 inches. 

6 inches. 
8 inches. 

io inches. 
,;' \ 7 '_■ inches. 
7x7 inches. 
7 xi 1 '; inches. 
7 xi 5} ■• inches. 
i'.- inches. 

1 1 l .\i5 1 .- inches. 
is'.xi.S'j inches. 



Outside Measure. 

7 inches. 

8 inches. 
10 inches. 
12' _• inches. 

4'_x N'.- inches. 

S' \ N' . inches. 

[3 inches. 

S'_. X17 inches. 

13 XI3 inches. 

15 XI7 inches. 

17 X17 inches. 



Round 
Round 
Round 
Round 
Square 
Square 
Square 
Square 
Square 
Square 
Square 



Weight v 




Feet to Carload 
of is ton* 

2144 
I580 
I364 
IOOO 
3OOO 
I5OO 
IOOO 

910 

750 

600 



A charge "l one foot additional will be made for pipe holes. 



26 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Directions for Erecting Terra Cotta Pipe Chimneys. 



CHIMNEY CAP. 




Mode of Erecting;. — The pipes should be set with their socket ends up (more especially for 
inside work), as this gives the best opportunity of making the joints tight, and prevents the mortar 
from dropping out. Especial care should be taken to completely fill the annular space between the 
spigot and socket ends of the pipe with mortar, as upon that depends the chimney's safety. Care- 
fully remove from inside of the pipe all projecting mortar before it hardens. Where joints are made 
above the roof, as illustrated in chimney 2, or when chimneys are erected on the outside of a 
building, great care should be taken to properly fill the joints with hydraulic cement mortar, and 
slope the cement filling from the pipe to outside of socket, so that the water will drain off and not 
enter the chimney. 

In districts where considerable rain falls, it might be advisable where chimneys are erected on 
the outside of a building, to reverse or erect with the sockets down, as illustrated in chimney 1. 

Size of Pipe. — The five-inch pipe is mostly used for small stoves; the six-inch for ranges; the 
eight-inch for fire-places or where more than one stove is to be connected with the chimney. Any 
chimney will give better satisfaction if only one stove is connected with it. 

We keep in stock at all times, the 5, 6 and 8-inch, with the necessary fittings, and frequently 
have on hand 10 and 12-inch, and can make any size up to 30-inch on short notice. 

Pipe without Sockets. — If you erect the chimney with the socket ends up, which is the proper 
mode, and desire to finish with a cap or top, the last or top pipe on the chimney must be without a 
socket, so that the cap or top will fit over it. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



27 



Occasionally in transit a length of pipe may have a piece broken out of the socket; in that event 
knock off the remainder of the socket, or if broken below that point, cut the pipe off evenly with a 
hatchet, chisel or saw, and use it for a top pipe. 

Openings or Ts. — Our chimney Ts are made in one and two feet lengths, and with openings 
2 to 12 inches in length. If you desire to connect two stoves with one chimney below the ceiling, as 
illustrated in chimney 3, you would require two Ts each a foot in length, one with an opening of 
sufficient length to pass through the partition. We make the openings of the following sizes, viz. : 
on the 5-inch pipe, 5 inch; on the 6-inch pipe, 5 and 6 inch; and on the 8-inch pipe, 6 and 8 inch. 

Bottom Pipes. — Bottom Pipes are made in two foot lengths, with the supporting rim placed at 
different distances (6 to 16 inches) above the bottom or spigot end. These pipes are used where 
you wish to start a chimney in the middle of a room, or at some point where it is not convenient or 
desirable to construct a shelf. The projecting rim is made to rest on the ceiling joists, or any support 
erected for the purpose, and is of sufficient strength to carry the weight of twenty-five feet of pipe. 

Tin Collars. — Where the pipe passes through a roof, ceiling, partition, or side of a building, 
the circular opening should be at least one inch larger than the outside diameter of the pipe, around 
which should be placed, and closely fitted to it, a tin or sheet-iron collar, which could be nailed to 
the wall or ceiling. When a tin collar is used where the pipe passes through the roof, hydraulic 
cement mortar should be used in connection with it, so as to make it perfectly water tight. 

Iron Roof Plates. — A roof plate (as illustrated in chimney 2) is slightly flaring at the top, so as 
to give sufficient space around the pipe in which to place hydraulic cement mortar. The upper, or 
side of the plate nearest to peak of roof, should be placed under the shingles. 

Another form of roof plate and one which we can highly recommend is illustrated in chimney 3. 
Instead of placing a pipe without a socket on the top of the chimney, it is placed one length lower, 
and one with a socket substituted, and placed with the socket end down and over the roof plate. 

Starting Plates. — Starting Plates can be of Terra Cotta, Iron or Wood. Place on either of 
these plates a layer of mortar one or two inches in thickness, into which the pipe should be pressed. 
A common and secure way is to lay a couple of courses of brick work on a wooden shelf 

With one of our hole starting plates the chimney can easily be cleaned. The hole can be closed 
with a cover, similar to those used to close stove-pipe holes in brick chimneys. 

Mortar. — Either of the following mortars will answer for inside work; ordinary lime mortar well 
slacked, lime mortar and hydraulic cement mixed, or one part hydraulic cement to two parts of clean. 
sharp sand. For work exposed to the weather, use the hydraulic cement and sand, and use as soon 
as mixed. 

Wooden Base. — A wooden base built into the roof, as illustrated in chimney 4, with the pipe 
extending six to twelve inches above the top of the base, on which and over th< Uced one 

of our Chimney Tops, which would make an oniamrnt.il and tine finish to the chimney, and prevent 
rain from entering it. 



Terra Cotta Starting Plates. 





With Hole. Solid. 

PRICE LIST. 

10x10 inch, for supporting 5-inch chimney pipe, either with hole or solid, price 40 cents. 

12x12 " " " 6 " " •■ " = . " 

I4 X, 4 " " s " .60 • 



28 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Terra Cotta Chimney Caps, 




..M- 







Nos. 1 8, 19, 20. 



No. 18— 
No. 19— 
No. 20— 
No. 21 — 
No. 22 — 
No. 23- 
No. 33— 
No. 34— 
No. 35— 
No. 36- 
No. 37— 
No. 38— 
No. 40 — 
No. 41— 
No. 42 — 
No. 43 — 
No. 44 — 
No. 45- 



Nos. 2i, 22, 23. Nos. 33, 34, 35. Nos. 36, 37, 38. Nos. 40, 41, 42,43, 44, 45. 



£1-25 
1.50 

2.00 
1. 00 

'•25 

1.50 

1-25 

1.50 

2.00 

1.50 

2.00 

2.50 
2.00 

2.50 
3.00 
3-50 

4.00 
4-5° 



PRICE LIST. 

each. This size tits over 5 inch Terra Cotta Chi 



' " 6 


" 












' " 8 


' ' 




1 ' 


" ' 






' " 5 


' * 




* ' 








' " 6 


' ' 




1 ' 


• 1 1 






• ■' 8 


" 




1 ' 


" * 






' " 5 


' ' 




' ■ 


" ' 






' • 6 


" 




* • 


" ' 






■ " S 


" 




" 


t i 1 






5 


" 












• '• 6 


' ' 




1 ' 


11 * 






., g 


" 




11 


" " ' 




' " 7 


.\7 


1 


nch 


Terra Cotta Flue Linings 


' " 7 


XII 


'-' 


* ' 


" " " " 


' " 7 


xi5 


y 2 


" 


" " ' * * ' 


" ujrf 


XII 


■ . 


1 * 


" " ' ' " 


" u# 


XI.S 


■-• 


" 


" • ' " " 


" '5K 


XI5 


■-■ 


1 ' 


1 1 IC 







uney Pipe. 



Terra Cotta Thimbles. 




DlAMETKR. 


■4'j Inches t.ong. 


6 Inches Long. 


8 Inches Long. 


10 Inches Long. 


ir Inches Long. 


5 inches. 


20 cents. 


25 cents. 


30 cents. 


35 cellts - 


40 cents. 


5% ■■ 


20 " 


25 


3° " 


35 " 


40 " 


6 


25 " 


3° 


35 " 


40 " 


45 


7 


3° " 


35 " 


40 


45 " 


50 " 


S 


35 " 


40 " 


45 " 


50 " 


55 " 




Terra Cotta Bonnet Tops. 



Size. 


Length. 


Price. Weight. 


5 inch. 

6 inch. 
8 inch 


,Vj feet. 
3 ' _■ feet. 
3'A feet. 


$1.50 50 lbs. 
2.00 65 lbs. 
2.50 80 lbs. 



DISCOUNT SHEET. 

Revised July 25, 1904, 

TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY TOPS, CAPS AWD THIMBLES. 

Terra Cotta Chimney Tops , . 40^ 

Terra Cotta Chimney Caps 40^ 

Terra Cotta Thimbles 40# 



Terms 60 days or 3 per cent, for cash. Packing extra. 

( On shipments from Lincoln, Free. 
Cartage, ( 

( On shipments from San Francisco or Oakland, 65^ per ton. 



S'AN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



29 



Terra Cotta Chimney Tops* 




In 1 ! 

1 

I 





No. 142. 



PRICE LIST. 



Number. 


Price. 


Outside at Dase. 


Inside at Base. 


Inside at Top. 


I40 


$3-50 


11 xii inches. 


9x9 inches. 


6 inches. 


HI 


450 


1:' ■\i: 1 .- inches. 


io'.'Xio'.- inches. 


8 inches. 


142 


5.00 


11 XII inches. 


9x9 inches. 


6 inches. 


'43 


6.00 


\:':xi2'- inches. 


lO'.XIO' .- ill' i 


S inches. 



DIRECTIONS FOR ERECTING TERRA COTTA CHIMNEY TOPS. 

Our tops are easily placed on any chimney, by taking off one or two courses of bri. • 
sufficient to >;ive the top a firm hold, then replacing the brick about the base of the Top with 
cement mortar. See that the top is set perfectly level. Many persons are under the irnpn- 
that these tops will not retain their pi. ices in windy weather, and think they should be constructed 
so as to socket into the chimney, but this is a mistake, If the proper pains are taken to set 
them on solid brick-work, they will resist as heavy windstorms as the chimney itself. 



30 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Terra Cotta Chimney Tops. 




re 







No. 165. 






No. 138. No. 139. 

PRICE LIST. 




Number. 


Price. 


Outside at Base. 


Inside at Base. 


Inside at Top. 


I6 5 


$3-25 


12 inches. 


10 inches. 


6 inches. 


166 


3-5° 


12 inches. 


10 inches. 


6 inches. 


I67 


3-5° 


12 inches. 


10 inches. 


6 inches. 


168 


4.00 


12 inches. 


10 inches. 


6 inches. 


136 


5.00 


14 inches. 


12 inches. 


8 inches. 


137 


4-25 


14 inches. 


12 inches. 


8 inches. 


138 


4-5° 


14 inches. 


12 inches. 


8 inches. 


139 


4-50 


14 inches. 


12 inches. 


8 inches. 



The Tops Xos. 165, 166, 167 and 16S will fit over 6-inch, the others over S-inch Terra Cotta Chimney Pipe. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



31 



Terra Cotta Chimney Tops. 




__ ■■ ■■■■' _ 



f 



Number. 


Price. 


1 MltSide at Base. 


Inside at Base. 




Inside at 


Top. 


148 


#4. 00 


12 XI2 


inches. 


10 XIO 


inches. 


: 


* 7 


inches. 


149 


6.00 


12 X 1 2 


inches. 


IO XIO 


inches. 


7 


* 7 


inches. 


150 


4.00 


13 x '3 


inches. 


II XII 


inches. 


8 




inches. 


»5' 


6.00 


15 XI 5 


inches. 


I 2 ' _• X I 2 ' _• 


inches. 


10 




inches. 


170 


5.00 


16 xi6 


inches. 


14 XI4 


inches. 


8 




inches. 


172 


7-50 


2 2 X22 


inches. 


20 X20 


inches. 


12 


x 12 


inches. 


175 


500 


I 2 ' & X I 2 ' g 


inches. 


lojixio 1 ; 


inches. 




* 7 




176 


6.00 


I 2 ' • X 1 7 


inches. 


lO'.-Xli 


inches. 


7 


XII' 


inches. 


'77 


7-5° 


I 2 ' .- X 2 I 


inches. 


IO'.-MO 


inclv 


7 


X15', 


inches. 


178 


800 


17 XI7 


incli 


15 XI5 


inches. 


11' 


.XII'.- 


inches. 


'79 


6.00 


12)4X12)4 


inches. 


io'.-xio'_- 


inches. 


7 


* 7 


inches. 


180 


7-5o 


I 2 J .- \ I " 


inches. 


1 ' _• x 1 5 


inches. 


7 


XII'.- 


inches. 


181 


9.00 


I2'_-X2I 


inches. 


IO'.-XIiJ 


inches. 




x-15'.. 


inches. 


t8a 


10.00 


17 XI7 


inches. 


15 XI5 


inches. 


11 


ixujA 


inches. 



-The Tops Nos. 175 to 18a are all of the same design and will fit over the Flue Linings on page 25. 



32 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Improved Flower Pots and Saucers, 




Our improved Flower Pots and Saucers far excel the old style in strength, uniformity of shape, 
etc. These pots are made of a clay much superior to that which is usually put into such goods. As 
will be seen in the cut, they are made so that the shoulder of one rests on the edge of the other, thus 
preventing the wedging of one into the other, which is the main cause of breakage in transit. 



PRICE LIST. 
POTS. 

2 Inch Pots $1-50 per 100 

2.y 2 Inch Pots 1.75 per 100 

3 Inch Pots 2.00 per 100 

4 Inch Pots 3.00 per 100 

5 Inch Pots 4.00 per 100 

6 Inch Pots 5.00 per 100 

7 Inch Pots 7.00 per 100 

8 Inch Pots 10.00 per 100 

9 Inch Pots 1 5.00 per 100 

10 Inch Pots 25.00 per 100 

12 Inch Pots 35-oo per 100 



SAUCERS. 



3 Inch Saucers $1.50 per 100 

4 Inch Saucers 2.00 per 100 

5 Inch Saucers 2.50 per 100 

6 Inch Saucers 3.50 per 100 

7 Inch Saucers 5.00 per 100 

8 Inch Saucers 6.50 per 100 

9 Inch Saucers 8.00 per 100 

10 Inch Saucers 10.00 per 100 

12 Inch Saucers 1500 per 100 



PALM TREE POT. 




14 Inch Pots $1.00 each 

16 Inch Pots 2.00 each 

18 Inch Pots 3.00 each 

22 Inch Pots 5.00 each 

jp aokiivg aivd 



14 Inch Saucers $0.40 each 

16 Inch Saucers 80 each 

18 Inch Saucers 120 each 

22 Inch Saucers 2.00 each 

CARTAGE EXTRA. 



t&~ When ordering Pots, if you also desire the Saucers, be particular to state it in your order. 



DISCOUNT SHEET TERRA COTTA URNS AND FLOWER POTS. 



Revised July 25, 1904, 



Terra Cotta Urns 30^ 

Flower Pots 30^ 



Terms 60 days or 3 per cent, for cash. Packing extra. 

( On shipments from Lincoln, Free. 
Cartage, ( 

( On shipments from San Francisco or Oakland, 65f( per ten. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



33 



Terra Cotta Urns* 



The Urns on this page are usually made in Red Terra Cotta, and to order only. 





Height, 24 inches. Width at top, 24 inches. 
Saucer, 13^x16^ inches. 
Price each $10.00 



Height, 21 inches. Width at top, 20 inches. 
Price each S10.00 





No. 32. No. 34-. 

Heigh!, 2q inches. Width at top, 32 inches. H ight, 31 inches. Width .it top. 30 inches. 
Special design. Trices given for similar work. Price each S1500 



PACKING AND CARTAGE EXTRA. 



34 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Terra Cotta Vases, 




PRICES WITH DIMENSIONS. 



No. i Width, 13 inches. 

No. 2 . . . . .... Width, 15 inches. 

No. 3 Width, 17 inches. 

No. 4 Width, 20 inches. 

No. 5 i Width, 23 inches. 

No. 12 Width. 13 inches. 

No. 13 Width, 17 inches. 

No. 15 1 Width, 14 inches. 

No. 24 Width, 18 inches. 

No. 30 Width, 36 inches. 

No. 31 Width, 26 inches. 



Height, 


12 inches. 


Price, 


$1-25 


Height, 


13 inches. 


Price, 


1.50 


Height, 


15 inches. 


Price, 


2.00 


Height, 


18 inches. 


Price, 


2.50 


Height, 


20 inches. 


Price, 


3.00 


Height, 


14 inches. 


Price, 


i-75 


Height, 


18 inches. 


Price, 


3-5o 


Height, 


21 inches. 


Price, 


3.00 


Height, 


22 inches. 


Price, 


4-50 


Height, 


25 inches. 


Price, 


15.00 


Height, 


17 inches. 


Price, 


6.00 



PACKING AND CARTAGE EXTRA. 



DISCOUNT SHEET TERKA COTTA VASES. 

Revised July 25, 1904. 
Terra Cotta Vases. 30^ 

Terns 60 days or 3 per cent, for cash. Packing extra. 

( On shipments from Lincoln, Free. 
Cartage, ( 

( On shipments from San Francisco or Oakland, 65^ per ton. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



35 



Terra Cotta Vases. 



VASE No. 4. 





§m^''B-Bmm 



VASE No. 27. 



PEDESTAL No. 50. 




PEDESTAL 

No. 51. 



m 







Width. 


PRICE 


LIST. 








Wise No. 4. 


20 inches. 


Height, 


■8 inches. 


Price, 


$2 50 


Wise No. 5. 


Width, 


23 inches. 


Height, 


20 inches. 


Price, 


300 


\ as<> No. 2,V 


Width, 


21 inches. 


Height, 


18 inches. 


Price. 


4.00 


Y.isc No. 27. 


Width. 


27 inches. 


Height. 


28 inches. 


Price, 


1500 


Pedestal No. 50., 


Width. 


16 inches. 


Height. 


15 inches. 


Price. 


2.50 


Pedestal No 51. 


Width. 


21 inches. 


Height. 


20 inches. 


Price. 


4.00 


Pedestal No. 55. V 


Width. 


16 inches. 


Height. 


20 inches. 


Price, 


4.00 




PACKING AND C/ 


kRTAGE EXTRA. 







36 GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




Hard and Porous Hollow Tile. 

"?jS?-EM*^ IR.C,-P,R,(_)C)f 1 IN (j, within the past twenty-five years, has advanced rap- 
idly to a position of great importance in the construction and protection of our 
prominent buildings, and few who can recall the general apathy toward any innova- 
tion upon the stereotyped methods of constructing buildings a few years since, can 
realize the encouraging progress made in the introduction and practical application 
of fire-proofing. In fact, a building erected at the present time, of any size or 
importance, is an exception if some method of fire protection is not incorporated in 
its construction. This change, marking as it does an era in building, has not been 
spasmodic, but rather the result of constant demand, produced, to a certain extent, by the efforts put 
forth by the promoters of non-combustible methods of building, but largely by the desire among 
careful, thinking men who contemplate the erection of beautiful buildings, to make them not only 
ornamental, but thorough and substantial as well. 

The losses by fire during the last decade have been almost unprecedented in the history of the 
West, and this has contributed in a marked degree to the demand for protection against the arch 
enemy, fire, not by carrying a heavy line of insurance (insurance will not prevent a building from 
burning), but rather in the only real protection to the interest of capital, i. e., in so erecting buildings 
that loss by fire is made impossible, thus obviating a heavy annual outlay for insurance premiums. 

Can a Building be made Fire-Proof? This is a question asked by thousands — and generally 
doubted even at this day. We maintain that a building can not only be erected fire-proof, but that 
when so designed, is necessarily constructed of material proof against the action of fire, and at the 
same time much more substantial and time-enduring than a combustible form of structure. 

What constitutes a Fire-Proof Building? Our reply is, that the term fire-proof , when applied 
to a building, contemplates that the edifice, in all its structural parts, should be formed entirely of 
non-combustible materials, meaning thereby that all the interior and exterior of the structure should 
be built of material calculated to successfully resist the injurious action of extreme heat. Beginning 
with a substantial foundation, the walls of a " Thoroughly Fire-Proof Building" should be built either 
of brick, terra cotta or stone. The great Chicago fire of 187 1 demonstrated conclusively that the 
only building material that successfully withstood the fire was "brick"; hence we say, construct 
your building of good brick as a base, and beautify it as taste may dictate, with terra cotta, etc. 

After the walls, the next factor of importance is the floors. In all cases they should be built with 
a combination of iron I-beams and non-combustible filling, covered over with cement concrete. 

The partitions for dividing the various floors into rooms, corridors, etc., should be built of abso- 
lutely non-combustible material, and where the roof and upper ceiling of the building are treated 
similarly, all danger of spread of fire in such a building is made impossible. 

It is often observed by skeptics that the wooden flooring, base, wainscot, architraves, d s, etc., 

that are put into a fire-proof building after the plastering has been applied is sufficient to burn the 
structure. This is most emphatically a misrepresentation, and can only be accepted as truth by 
novices, for the reason that so long as "fire" can be confined to its prescribed limits, as in the case 
of furnaces, boilers, fireplaces, etc., it becomes an easy agent to control; but when afforded any 
opportunity by flagrant neglect in building, it is a matter of time only when the best structure, built 
of combustible materials, will be reduced to cinders; therefore, we maintain that when the structural 
portions of the building are non-combustible, the contents can be what they may; and in case fire 
does attack them, the loss is merely nominal, as the fire cannot spread from the room of its inception. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



37 



The use of various materials has been introduced for the purpose of fire-proof protection for 
buildings, all more or less effective. The general, and perhaps to-day the oldest modern system for 
floor construction, has been the brick arch between iron beams; then have followed the corrugated 
iron and concrete arch, lime of teil plaster arch, and numerous others, including the Hollow Tile flat 
arch. All these systems have their advantages, and consequently any of them are much to be pre- 
ferred to a wooden form of construction, but they also have disadvantages when compared one with 
the other. 




Interior View of Fire-Proof Building. 



The question, then, is to determine which method of construction is the best and has the 
fewest delects. 

To this end we have devoted fifteen years' practical experience, and have found that of all 
materials yet produced for interior tire-proof construction, lire clay Hollow Tile Arches and Parti- 
tions take precedence over every known material and method. 

The view above represents the interior of an ideal fire-proof building . and in presenting it a 
positive reply is given to those who may doubt the possibility of absolute protection from fire in a 
building. 



38 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



HOLLOW TILE PARTITIONS. 




We make 2-inch, 3-inch, 4-inch, 5-inch and 6-inch Hollow Tile for Partitions. The 3-inch and 
4-inch are mostly used. 



12" — iz" „ iz" „ iz" ., iz" 



□OlDDlPg 



Plan View of Partition. 



FURRING TILE. 




We make i-inch, 1 '..-inch and 2-inch Tile for furring brick walls. The 1 '..-inch is mostly used. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



39 



HOLLOW TILE ROOFING. 



SECTION. 




ISOMETRIC VIEW. 




This is the most substantial and durable svtem of rool construction for fire-proof buildings 
devised. It has been successfully used on the roots of the following fire-proof buildings in San 
Francisco, viz. : The Spring Valley Water Company's Building; also, the Union Trust and Mutual 
Life Insurance Companies' Buildings. 



STANDARD HOLLOW TILE FLOOR ARCHES 

* 




We make this shape of Arch to tit 6-inch, 7-inch, 8-inch and 9-inch I-beams 

The 6-inch and 7-inch for spans of 5 feet are safe for live loads of 250 pounds per squar 
The 8-inch for spans of 5 feel 6 inches are sale for live loads ol 250 pounds per square foot. 
The 9-inch for spans o\ 6 feel are safe for live loads o\ 2~,o pounds per square 



40 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



END PRESSURE HOLLOW TILE FLOOR ARCHES. 

Patented July 21, J89J. 
ISOMETRIC VIEW. 







VvV-~ 






SECTIONS. 

-2 



v\-:-K-lV.'. -£;' ? >. .: 






6 -0 



£3 




DO 



Section im Line A A 




Section on Line B E 

_ 







Section on Lino C C 






We make these arches in 8, 9, 10, 12 and 15-inch depths. They are 25 per cent, lighter and 
much stronger than the old style or standard arches, and can be adapted to any span. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



41 



SEGMENTAL HOLLOW TILE FLOOR ARCHES. 

The following arches of the spans shown are safe for a live load of 250 pounds per square foot, 
with a safety factor of four. 

The spring line and rise can be varied to suit any span or depth of beam. 

In 1S95 we set in place in the Parrott Building, this city, 225,000 square feet of the 4-inch Seg- 
mental Arch between 15-inch I-beams, with the tie rods placed three inches below the top flanges. 

After a test had been made, it was clearly demonstrated that the arches were as safe and as strong 
as they would have been had the tie rods been placed midway between the top and bottom flanges of 
the beams. 



10-0 




1G-0 




42 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



CEILING TILE. 



SECTION. 



Detail xvhen supported 
with 1 '-i x J Ct Irons 



'} i Barb ■■■ 



Wooden 
J Wire Natl 




I 




No. 8 Penny finishing null 
2 from each end 



n 



X>«-t:iIl wben supported 

with No. 14 by is/' Band Irons 



■t- , , 




%„ 



. I ' tauli end 



• nnlsblng nail j { J 



ISOMETRIC VIEWS. 




i :..___...!: 



;i x 12 x 12 inch Tile, suspended on i ' 4 x i ' 4 T-Irons. 




'..x 12 x 12 inch Tile, suspended from Wood Joists. 




.*. 4.^ * 46--— : 

, x 12 x 15U inch Tile, suspended on $\s T- Irons. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



43 



TILE COLUMN CASING. 



SOLID. 



HOLLOW. 






We make these i<>r columns of any diameter; .ilso. Hollow Tile C square columns. 



44 GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



HOLLOW TILE FIRE PROOFING. 

The following is a list of buildings erected during the past few years, for which we have 
furnished from $5,000 to $125,000 worth of Hollow Tile Fire Proofing: 

BUILDINGS. LOCATION. ARCHITECTS. 

Crocker San Francisco A. Page Brown. 

City Hall Dome San Francisco Shea & Shea. 

French Hospital San Francisco Mooser & Goustiaux. 

German Savings and Loan Society . . . San Francisco Kenitzcr & Kollofrath. 

Hobart San Francisco Percy & Hamilton. 

Mr. Wm. G. Irwin Residence San Francisco Reid Brothers. 

Mills San Francisco Burnham & Root. 

Mutual Life Insurance Co San Francisco Clinton Day. 

Parrott San Francisco Pissis & Moore. 

Claus Spreckels San Francisco Reid Brothers. 

Mr. Claus Spreckels Residence San Francisco Reid Brothers. 

Emma Spreckels San Francisco Reid Brothers. 

San Francisco Chronicle San Francisco Burnham & Root. 

San Francisco Examiner San Francisco A. C. Schweinfurth. 

Spring Valley Water Co San Francisco Clinton Day. 

Union Trust Co San Francisco Clinton Day. 

United States Post Office San Francisco U. S. Supervising Architect. 

Los Angeles County Court House. . . . Los Angeles, Cal Curlett, Eisen & Cuthbertson. 

City Hall Los Angeles, Cal Caukin & Hass. 

Sacramento Electric Light and 1'ower Co. . Sacramento, Cal N. L. Mayo. 

United States Post Office Sacramento, Cal U. S. Supervising Architect. 

United States Post Office San Jose, Cal U. S. Supervising Architect. 

Fresno County Hall Records Fresno, Cal J. M. Curtis. 

Placer County Court House . . ... Auburn, Cal J. M. Curtis. 

Kern County Court House Bakerslield, Cal B. McDougall & Sons. 

San Diego County Court House .... San Dieso, Cal Comstock & Trotsche. 

Santa Cruz County Court House .... Santa Cruz, Cal N. A. Comstock. 

Free Library Portland, Ore Whidden & Lewis. 

Portland City Hall Portland, Ore Whidden & Lewis. 

United States Customs House Portland, Ore U. S. Supervising Architect. 

King County Court House Seattle, Wash W. A. Ritchie. 

King County Alms House and Hospital . . Seattle, Wash XV. A. Ritchie. 

Fidelity Trust Co Tacoma, Wash Burnham & Root. 

Jefferson County Court House Port Townsend, Wash. . . . W. A. Ritchie. 

Thurston County Court House Olympia, Wash W. A. Ritchie. 



hjv±^%l o4- 



& ■ o) I"* L^A^^ cLs /Lw- alt jt iaJ^ & ft™. <^ . cJPu fc f - 

3. c|a.c-^^>^>(^ /y+/tA±tY<. dku c 







SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



45 



FIRE BRICK, 




Square, per 1000, 
Split, per 1000, 
Arch, per iooo, 




^.^r,..M°~ 

A02*...t 

.9.0.%?. ...-. 



.W- 



Jamb, per iooo, 
Circle, per iooo, 




Key, per iooo, $. . ftAr: :.«- ■».» . !^~— 



..**.! 



.... 



Dimensions. 



24x12x3 inches. 
24x15x3 inches. 
28x12x3 inches. 



FIRE TILE. 




Dimensions. 


Shape. 


Price Each. 


Dimensions 


Shape. 


Price Each. 


Sx Sx2 inches. 


Square edge. 


$ .20 


i8x 6x6 inches. 


Square edge. 


.- .83 


10x10x2 inches. 


Square edge. 


■3° 


24X 6x6 inches. 


Square edge. 




12x12x2 inches. 


Square edge. 


.40 


24x12x2 inches. 


Square edge. 


1. 00 


14x14x2 inches. 


Square edge. 


•65 


24x12x3 inches. 


Si|u;ire ei 1 


1.2.S 


16x16x2 inches. 


Square edge. 


•85 


20x15x3 ini 


Square edge. 


1.50 


18x18x2 inches. 


Square edge. 


i. 00 


24x15x3 inches. 


5qua 


2.00 


I2X 6x2 inches. 


Square edge. 


.20 


28x12x3 inches. 


Square edge. 


1-75 


14.x 6x2 inches. 


Square edge. 


• 25 


28x15x3 inches. 


Square edge. 


2.00 


i6x 6x2 inches. 


Square edge. 


■3° 


v; inches. 


Square edge. 




iSx 6x2 inches. 


Square edge. 


•35 


36x15x3 inches. 


Square ei 






Sliapi 

Rangi d 
Flanged edge. 
Flanged edge. 






Dimensions 



- 



28x1 s\.; inches. 

30XI s\; inches. 
. inches. 



i edge. 






Any site or shape can be made to .nlcr at short notice 



FIRE CLAY. 

t .11 loads. ( rude, in bulk, per ton £ A . 

Carloads, Finely Ground, in sacks, per ton 

lhan carloads, per sack of 200 lbs AG- 

When Ground Clay and Hrick Dust is furnished in carload lots, we r the sacks, 

■hey are returned to us in good condition. When rt ired. 



FIRE BRICK DUST. 

Carloads, in sacks, per ton 

I ess than carloads, per 






1 Price according to quantity and point of delivery. 



46 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ENAMELED HOLLOW TILE. 



V 'h v i 'I *tt % ''t "A **s **< " 







We make this Hollow Enameled Tile 4 and 6 inches thick and usually 12 inches square, and 
weighing 20 pounds per square foot for the 4-inch and 25 pounds per square foot for the 6-inch. 

Owing to the lightness of the tile, also its glazed, non-absorbent surface and /ire-proof qualities, 
it is especially adapted for walls of light courts in large buildings. Their lightness permits the erec- 
tion to start on I-beams at any story, and for this reason their use is especially desirable. 

ENAMELED BRICK. 

Enameled Brick ordered "by mistake" or in excess of requirements will not be taken back. 
We carry in stock Cream-White Enameled Brick, American size, 8£ x 4^ x2-j|- inches in the 
following shapes: 

PRICE LIST. 



Per 1000. 
Shape No. 75, enameled on one face and one end . . .$200 



Shape No. 76, 
Shape No. 77, 
Shape No. lor, 
Shape No. 102, 
Shape No. 103, 



one face and one end . . . 200 

one face and two ends . . 200 

one face 125 

one end 100 

one face and one end. . 200 



I'er 1000. 

Stretchers, enameled on one face $85 

Headers, Single, " one end 80 

Headers, Double, " two ends 90 

Quoins, Square, " one face and one end . 100 

Returns, " one face and two ends 150 

Shape No. 58, " one face and one end . no 

Shape No. 59, " one lace and one end . 1 10 

For Shapes Nos. 58 to 103, see pages 49, 52 and 53. We can make almost any size or shape to order. 

For Grays, Browns, Blues, Greens or Blacks, add $20.00 per 1000. 

In order to insure safe transportation, these brick, even if shipped in carloads, ought to be crated. This will 
cost % 10.00 per 1000 additional; but if the crates are returned to us in good condition, with the charges prepaid, 
we will allow a rebate of $7-50 per 1000. 

Transportation companies will not receive enameled brick in less than carloads, unless they are crated. 

Empty crates can be returned to the shipping point at 15 per cent, of the tariff. 

5500 shipped loose or 5000 crated will make a 15-ton carload. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



47 



Pressed Brick. 



Moulded or Ornamental Bricks ordered "by mistake" or in excess of requirements will not be 

taken back. 

F RICE LIST 
For First Quality, Buff Shades, Nos. 35, 36, 38, 40, 42, 45; and Gray Shade No. 60. 



Standard Shape. 
Roman ' ' 
Roman ' ' 



PLAIN BRICK. 



Size, 8% x 4 x 2^i inches 
" 8^x4x1^ " 



J540.00 per 1000. 
35-oo 
45.00 



5500 to a 15-ton carload 

7500 

5500 



MOULDED BRICK. 

Standard Size, S 1 ^ x4x2fs inches; Roman Size, 8'+ x 



Our Moulded Brick are of the following dimensions 
4x 1% inches. Special shapes made to order. 

Nos. 40, 41, 42, 50, 53, 55, 56, 58, 59, 65, 70, 71, 77, 80, 81, 82, 90, 91 

Nos. 92, 95, 96, IOI, I02, IO4, 105, 107, I08, III, 112, II4, 121 . . 

Mitre Brick, Nos. 75, 76, 83, 103, 106, 109, 113, 115 

Semicircle Arch Brick, No. 200, Plain Reveals 

" " " " Moulded Reveals 

Flat Arch Brick, No. 202, Plain Reveals 

" " " Moulded Reveals 



$ 65.00 per 1000 



85 


00 


65- 


00 ' 


75 


00 


75 


00 


00.00 



ORNAMENTAL BRICK. 

Nos. 140, 142, 144, 146 $125.00 per icco 

MANTEL BRICK. 
For these add to our prices the cost of crating, also $5.00 per 1000 for selected brick. 

CRATING. 

Our prices are based 011 shipping brick loose. If crated, they will cost an additional <7-5° per 1000, but if the 
crates are returned to us in good condition, with .ill charges prepaid, then we will allow a rebate of £5.00 per 1000. 

Transportation companies will not receive pressed brick in less than carloads, unless they are crated. Empty 
crates can be returned to the station shipped from at 15 per cent, of the tariff. 



DELIVERY. 

CARLOADS. We will deliver carloads .it the above prii es on the cars at any of the following places, to wit: 

Hanford, Napa, ramento, Stockton. 

Hollister, < lakdale, Salinas St. Helena. 

Marysville, Oroville, San I South Vallejo, 



Auburn, 

Benicia, 

Calistoga, 

i ;hico, 

Fresno, 

Gilroy, 



Mi ,,i,, Park, Palo Alto, San Mateo, Suisun, 

Merced, Petaluma, San Rafael. Watsooville, 

Modesto, Redwood City, Cnu, Woodland. 

Monterey. Red Bluff, Santa Rosa, 

LESS THAN CARLOADS. We will deliver free 1000 or more at any point in San Francisco. Oakland, 
Alameda or Berkeley, or any quantity in our San Francisco or Oakland Yards of on the cars at Lincoln, California. 



NOTICE. 

.Id a large number of any particular shape or shade of brick be required, please place your orders about 
hcTd.us before needed. This will enable us to make prompt delivery. See stenk shapes on the following pages. 



48 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



PRESSED BRICK. 

Isometric Views, showing average coursing and length of our Buff Pressed Brick. 

STANDARD SHAPE. 

Size — Sj+X4.\2j'8 inches. 
Laid with / s bed and ,Vinch head mortar joints. 







\ 


\ \ \ 


N 




N \ 






12 ' >' — » 


*1 f T it T 


t 


t 


t 


T 1 


^\ ^^ 




ic",»" -» 


5 s 

1 -ft •* 






\Tx 




20 ■' 


1 ° J 9 










\ \* 






2.3 h ' -> 1 S g ^ 


f s 




^\ r\^ 






29V - I ~ 


o 


~_2 


*\* 




\ ^v 1 


<~ 




»J4" — > | 


CI 


*p ! 


\n \/ 


<- 




do 


\ ^V s 


<- 




12" * 




1 o 

1 CO 




«- 




«'"„ 




v 






< — 






50/id " 


> 


i 


— 








54 «' 


— > 










ss k" -> L 


\I3 


- 


03/ia * 



ROMAN SHAPE. 

Size — 8;4 x 4 x I $( inches. 
Laid with }4 bed and j^-inch liead mortar joints. 




ROMAN SHAPE. 

Size — 1 1 :V x 3 % x i U inches. 
Laid with % bed and yV head mortar joints. 

This shape varies in length from n?^ to 12 inches. Three headers with the mortar joints will equal one stretcher. 
We advise the use of our Roman shape size 8Jj xjxi V in piers and mantels on account of their bonding better than 
the long brick. When used in mantels, lay with Ja-inch bed and head joints. 



— ' f - ^*K' 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



49 



PRESSED BRICK 



Scale 'X full size. 




Roman Shape 

1/" 7/" »/" 

11% I37!S1 1 I 




Roman Shape 





Standard Shape 
8' : x ("xa'/ 






59 




58 





All the shapes on this page are made i ; , or »M inches thick. 



50 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



PRESSED BRICK. 



Scale 'i full size. 




53 







40 







81 





Any Radius from 3 ft. O In. up. 




All the shapes on this page are made i% or 2J6 inches thick. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



51 



PRESSED BRICK. 



Scale '4 full size. 











71 




All the shapes on this page are made ncbes thick. 



52 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



PRESSED BRICK. 



Scale !4 full size. 







101 





104 




105 




107 



:\ 




10S 




111 




112 



AH the shapes on this page are made &/% inches thick. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



53 



PRESSED BRICK. 



Scale )i full size. 




103 



Rights & Lefts 




Mitre for Nos. 101-102. 




113 \ 

Rights & Lefts 






Mitre for Nos. 111—112. 








109 
Rights & Lefts 




IOC 
Rights & Lefts 




Mitre for Nos. 107-108. 



Mitre for Nos. 104 105. 





Mitre for No. 144. 




7(5 

Rights & Lefts 




Starter for No. 59. 



Starter for No. 58. 



All the shapes on this page are made 2' s inches thick. 



54 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



PRESSED BRICK. 



Scale \i full size. 






All the shapes on this page are made iH or Wi inches thick. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



55 



PRESSED BRICK. 



Scale % full size. 





Nos. 83 and 104 are made .'4 inches thick. All the other shapes are made either aches thick. 



56 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



PRESSED BRICK. 



Scale % full size. 




Nos. 114, 115, 140 and 142 are made 2% inches thick. All the other shapes are made either i : V or 2H inches thick. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



57 



PRESSED BRICK. 

Fluted for Pilasters. 
With Fluted Returns. 




5 8 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



PRESSED BRICK. 



FLAT ARCH. 




No. 202 

Give the following details : 
Width of Opening Height of Face 

Depth of Reveal or Soffit Thickness of Joints 

We provide for , ',,-inch mortar joints unless otherwise specified. 



SEMI-CIRCLE ARCH. 




Give the following details : 
Width of Opening Radius Depth of Reveal or Soffit 

Height of Face Thickness of Joints 



We provide for ,', inch mortar joints unless otherwise specified. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



59 



BRICK MANTEL No. I. 




Width of" Breast 5 feet 7 inches. Returns at Sides 1 foot oj g inches. 

Height of Mantel 4 " 3 Depth of Fire Box 1 " 9 

Width of Opening 2 " 9% " Height of Opening 2 feet 5 

Length of Heartli 5 " 7 " Width of Hearth 2 ' 1 

Price ot Buff Face and Molded Brick necessary to erect this Mantel. Hearth and Fire Box, $30.00. 

Wood Shelf not included. 
For this Mantel use our Roman shape brick, size 8^x4x1^ inches, laid with ' -inch mortar joints. 
The dimensions ot this Mantel can he varied by adding or omitting one or more lengths or courses 

of brick. 
We securely crate the brick for shipment, also furnish 1 '.--inch scale drawing showing how to erect 

this Mantel. 



60 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



BRICK MANTEL No. 2. 




Width ol Breast 4 feet 10^ inches. 

Height of Mantel 4 " d,y 2 

Width of Opening 2 " 9^ " 

Length of Hearth 4 " ioJ^ " 



Returns at Sides 1 foot o3/jj inches. 

Depth of Fire Box 1 " 9 

Height of Opening 2 feet 6 

Width of Hearth 2 " 1 



Price of Buff Face and Molded Brick necessary to erect this Mantel, Hearth and Fire Box, $25.00. 

Wood Shelf not included. 
For this Mantel use our Standard shape brick, size 8^x4x254 inches, laid with ^8-inch mortar joints. 
The dimensions of this Mantel can be varied by adding or omitting one or more lengths or courses 

of brick. 
We securely crate the brick for shipment, also furnish 1 J^-inch scale drawing showing how to erect 

this Mantel. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



61 



BRICK MANTEL No. 3. 




Width ol Breast 4 feet 10J4 inches. 

Height of Mantel 4 " i'_. 

Width of Opening 2 " 9!.. " 

Length of Hearth 4 " io> 4 ' " 



Returns at Sides 1 foot o}i inches. 

Depth of Fire Box 1 " 9 

Height of Opening 2 feet 6 

Width of Hearth 2 " 1 



Price of Buff Face and Molded Brick necessary to erect this Mantel, Hearth and Fire Box, $25.00. 

Wood Shelf not included. 
For this Mantel use our Roman shape brick, size 8^x4x1 - : 4 inches. laid with '--inch mortar joints. 
The dimensions of this Mantel can be varied by adding or omitting one or more lengths or courses 

of brick. 
We securely crate the brick for shipment, also furnish 1 ' .-inch scale drawing showing how to erect 

this Mantel. 



62 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



BRICK MANTEL No. 4. 




Width of Breast 5 feet 7 inches- 
Height of Mantel 8 " i'A " 

Height of Top Shelf. 5 " o " 

Width of Opening 2 " 9'. " 

Length of Hearth 5 " 7 " 



Returns at Sides 1 foot 4I4 inches. 

Depth of Fire Box 1 " 9 

Height of Opening 2 feet 8 " 

Width of Hearth 2 " 1 



Wood Shelf 



Price of Buff Face and Molded Brick necessary to erect this Mantel, Hearth and Fire Box, $42.50. 

and Cornice not included. 
For this Mantel use our Standard shape brick, size 8'.,x4x2->s inches, laid with Vg-inch mortar joints. 
The dimensions of this Mantel can be varied by adding or omitting one or more lengths or courses of brick. 
We securely crate the brick for shipment, also furnish 1 'i-inch scale drawing showing how to erect this Mantle. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



63 



BRICK MANTEL No. 5. 




Width of Breast 4 feet io' 4 inches. 

Height of Mantel 4 " 1 ' .- 

Width of Opening 2 " q'_- 

Length of Hearth 4 " io' 4 



Returns at Sides 1 foot oH inches. 

Depth of Fire Bun 1 " 8 

Height of Opening 2 feet 6 

Width of Hearth 2 " 1 



Price of Buff Face and Molded Brick necessary to erect this Mantel. Hearth and Fire Box. 550.00. 

Wood Shelf not included. 
For this Mantel use our Roman shape brick, size S' 4 X4XI - ; j inches, laid with 's-inch mortar joints. 
The dimensions of this Mantel can be varied by adding or omitting one or more lengths or courses 

of brick. 
We securely crate the brick for shipment, also furnish 1 '.--inch scale drawing showing how to erect 

this Mantel. 



64 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



BRICK MANTEL No. 6. 




Width of Breast 4 feet ioj^ inches. 

Height of Mantel 4 " 2 " 

Width of Opening 2 " 9^ " 

Length of Hearth 4 " 10^ " 



Returns at Sides 1 loot o3/6 inches. 

Depth of Fire Box 1 " 9 

Height of Opening 2 feet 6 

Width of Hearth 2 " 1 



Price of Buff Face and Molded Brick necessary to erect this Mantel, Hearth and Fire Box, $22.50. 

Wood Shelf not included. 
For this Mantel use our Standard shape brick, size 8^x4x236 inches, laid with ' j-inch mortar joints. 
The dimensions of this Mantel can be varied by adding or omitting one or more lengths or courses 

of brick. 
We securely crate the brick for shipment, also furnish 1 J^-inch scale drawing showing how to erect 

this Mantel. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



65 



BRICK MANTEL No. 7. 




Width ol Breast 7 feet 8 inches. 

Height of Mantel 4 " 10^ " 

Width of Opening 4 " 2% " 

Length of Hearth 7 " S " 

Width of Opening between Hobs 



Returns at Sides . . 1 foot 0-=b inches. 

Depth of Fire Box 1 " 9 

Height of Opening 2 feet 9 

Width of Hearth 2 " 1 

2 " f)Yi " 



Price of Buff Face and Molded Brick necessary to erect this Mantel, Hearth and Fire Box, $50.00. 

Wood Shelf not included. 
For this Mantel use our Roman shape brick. size S ' 4 \ 4 \ 1 . inches, laid with 's-inch mortar joints. 
The dimensions ol this Mantel can be varied by adding or omitting one or more lengths or coi. 

of brick. 
We securely crate the brick for shipment, also furnish 1 '.--inch scale drawing showing how to erect 

this Mantel. 



66 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



TILE MANTEL No. 20. 




Width of Breast 8 feet 2% inches. 

Height of Mantel 6 " 6^ 

Width of Opening ... 2 " 9/4 " 
Length of Hearth 8 " 2% 



Returns at Sides 1 toot 6 1 .- inclies. 

Depth of Fire Box 1 " 6' 2 

Height of Opening 2 feet 9J4 " 

Width of Hearth 2 " 9 



Price of Mottled Bull Tile necessary to erect this Mantel, Shelf, Hearth and Fire Box, $65.00. 

For this Mantel use our 8x8.\2-inch tile for the face, hearth and fire box, with sufficient of other sizes 

for the shelf, all laid with 34-inch mortar joints. 
The dimensions can be varied by adding or omitting tile. 
We securely crate the tile for shipment, also furnish 1 J^-inch scale drawing showing how to erect 

this Mantel. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



67 



TILE MANTEL No. 21. 




Width of Breast 5 feet II # inches. 

Height of Mantel 4 ' 9 : 'i 

Width of Opening 2 " 7 

Length of Hearth 5 " n'.- 



Returns at Sides 1 foot to'.- inches. 

Depth "i Fire Box 1 " 10 

Height of Opening .. 
Width of Hearth 2 



Price 01 Mottled Buff Tile necessary to erect this Mantel. Shelf. Hearth and Fire 1 - 

For this Mantel use our IOXIOX2 inch tile for the face, hearth and tire box. with sufficient ol other 

sizes for the shelf, all laid with Vinch mortar joints. 
The dimensions can be varied by adding or omitting tile. 
We securely .rate the tile for shipment, also furnish t '.-inch scale drawing showing how to erect 

this Mantel. 



68 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



TILE MANTEL No. 22. 




Width of Breast 9 feet 2 inches. 

Height of Mantel 8 " 9 " 

Width of Opening 5 " l}£ " 

Length of Hearth 9 "2 " 



Returns at Sides 2 feet 2 l /i inches. 

Depth of Fire Box 2 " 2 " 

Height of Opening 4 " 1*4 " 

Width of Hearth 3 " o^ " 



Price of Mottled Buff Tile necessary to erect this Mantel, Shell, Cornice, Hearth and Fire Box, $100.00. 
For this Mantel use our I2xi2x2-inch tile for the face, hearth and fire box, with sufficient of other 

sizes for the shelf and cornice, all laid with 
The dimensions can be varied by adding or omitting tile. 
We securely crate the tile for shipment, also furnish 1 '4-inch scale drawing showing how to erect 

this Mantel. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



69 



TERRA COTTA ROOFING TILE. 




*?*' 



AWWV 



•S" SHAPE SPANISH TILE. 




li 



•S" EAVE TILE. 



l 






FLAT TILE. 



Our Terra Cotta Rooting Tiles ran be seefl on the following buildings : 



Resideuce Mrs Augusta K Gibbs San Francisco 
Mis Ri ginald K Smith, Sai 
Mr. Claus Sprecteels, San Pran< - 
Mr. F, H. McCullagta, Los Gatos, Cal. 

Mr V. J A Ri Cal. 

Mrs. O.J. Pay, wmthrop Cal 

Mr. D. ¥ 

Mr. Waiter p. Bnrrell, Portland, Oregon 

Clans Spreckels Building San FranciSCO, 

Golden Gate Park Pumping Station. San Francisco. 



Lclan - 

>ainte Claire CUib Building, San Tt»*c. Cal. 

Columbarium 

Santa I 

SI -cklon. Cal. 
'. Cal 
Bank of - 
Green m ia. Cal. 

Telephone Station t o< Angeles. Cal. 
Fire Fnginc H nolulo H I 



70 GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



Architectural Terra Cotta. 

One of the most marked improvements connected with the building trade during the past decade 
is the use of Terra Cotta for the purpose of architectural decoration. 

The growing popularity of Terra Cotta is conclusively proven by its use in many of the most 
artistic and costly fire proof buildings of to-day. 

QUALITY. 

We have spared neither time, money nor energy to enable us to offer the best quality of Water 
Proof Terra Cotta that can be produced. The bodies of our wares are unexcelled for strength, 
beauty and durability. As we employ the best artists that can be procured, our wares also excel 
from an artistic point of view. 

COLOR. 

We can manufacture any shape and shade in buff, red, brown or gray, in fact we are prepared to 
match almost any color of brick or sandstone. 

We should be glad to furnish, upon application, small samples of any of the above colors. 

ESTIMATES. 

Owing to the great variation in design, shape and dimensions of this class of work, it is necessary, 
in order to make an intelligent estimate, for us to have elevations (showing the Terra Cotta tinted in 
green or red) sections and plans with figured dimensions. 

SPECIAL DESIGNS. 

To produce special designs it is absolutely necessary to have the fullest accurate information and 
all the details at least sixty days before the first of the work is required. 

DIMENSIONS. 

When making details for Terra Cotta allow not to exceed one-quarter (' 4 ') inch for mortar joints. 
If possible, detail the work to course both in height and length with our pressed brick, as shown by 
the views on page 48. 



NOTICE. 



The Terra Cotta designs illustrated on the following pages we do not carry in stock. 
We have the moulds and can duplicate at 6 weeks' notice any of the designs for which we have 
given prices. The patterns for which prices are not given are special; prices quoted for similar work. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



71 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 

The following ts a list of buildings erected during the past few years for which we have furnished from 
$2,000 to $75,000 worth of Architectural Terra Cotta. 



Buildings and Location. Architects. 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Affiliated Colleges J. E Krafft, Marteus & Coffey 

Auzerais Building Pissis & Moore 

Clark Building Edward R. Swaiu 

Chronicle Building Burnham & Root 

Curtaz Building Kmil John 

Win. H. Crocker's Residence . . . Curlett & Cuthbertson 

Crellin Building W.J.Mathews 

California Hotel and Theatre . . J. M. Wood 

Casey Building H. A. Schulze 

Delmonico Cafe Pissis & Moore 

Douohoe Building A. Page Brown 

Golden Gate Park Music Stand . Reid Brothers 

Hall of Justice Shea & Shea 

Hale Brothers Building Reid Brothers 

Hearst Building (S. F. Examiner) A. C. Schweinfurth 

Hotel Savoy Pissis & Moore 

Kohn & Ivaucovitch Building . . Pissis & Moore 

Liebes Building Kmil John 

Mercantile Library Pissis & Moore 

Mills Building Burnham & Root 

Mission High School Havens & Toepke 

Mission Masonic Lodge Hermann & Swain 

Moffat Building C. R. Wilson 

McCarthy Bdg. (Smith Cash Store) Shea & Shea 
Mutual Life Ins. Co.'s Building . Clinton Day 

New City Hall D.ome Shea & Shea 

Otis Building Wm. F. Smith 

Parrott Building (Sacramento and 

Davis Sts.) Pissis & Moore 

Pacific States Telephone & Tele- 
graph Co.'s Building . . . Wm. F. Smith 

Pioneer Hall Wright 81 Sanders 

San Francisco Savings Union . . Wm. Curlett 

San Francisco Verein Building . . Salficld & Kohlberg 

San Francisco Gas & Electric 

Light Co. Clinton Day 

Sharon Estate Building Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge 

Soiuers Building (Press Club) . Percy & Hamilton 

Southern Police Station Shea & Shea 

Spring Valley Water Works Bldg. Clinton Day 

St. Dunstan Building Clinton Day 

Studebaker Building Clinton Day 

Supreme Court Building T.J.Welsh 

St. Nicholas Hotel J. H. I.ittlefield 

Claus Spreckels Building Reid Brothers 

Spreckels Market Building . . . Reid Brothers 

Spreckels Building (Market, near 

Eddy St.) Reid Brothers 



John D. Spreckels' Residence 
Clans Spreckels' Residence 
Risdon Iron Works Building 

*Techau Tavern 

Union Trust Co.'s Building . 
•United States Post Office . . 
Wells, Fargo ft Co.'s Building 



. Reid Brothers 

. Reid Brothers 

. W. J. Mathews 

. Chas. M. Rossi ru 

. Clinton Day 

. U. S. Supervising Architect 

. Percy ft Hamilton 



Young Building Kenitzer S; Barth 

Stockton, Cal. 

Pioneer Hall Percy So Hamilton 

St. John's Church A. Page Brown 

Yosemite Theatre Wood & E.ovell 

Habbard-Bours-Sali Building W, w.Oates 

Oakland, Cal. 

Oakland Gas Light & Heat 

Co.'s Building Coxluad & Coxhead 

San Diego, Cal. 

Elk Building Zinimer & Reamer 

Marston Building Reid Brothers 

*Wl furnished FnauiL-lted Terra Cotta for these buildings 



Buildings and Location. 



Architects. 



Salinas, Cal. 

McDougall Building W. H. Weeks 

Watsonville, Cal. 

Pajaro Valley Bank Building . . . .A.B.Chalmers 

Hollister, Cal. 

Grangers' Union Building Wieland & Binder 

Auburn, Cal. 

Placer County Court House .... J.M.Curtis 

San Jose, Cal. 

O. A. Hale Building Reid & Meeker 

Santa Cruz, Cal. 

Santa Cruz County Court House 



. N. A. Comstock 



I,os Angeles, Cal. 

Byrne Building Sumner P. Hunt 

Boston Dry Goods Store Eisen & Hunt 

Douglass Building Reid Brothers 

Hunt Hotel John Parkinson 

Howell Building Burton & Parkinson 

Homer Laughlin Building John Parkinson 

Main St. Improvement Co.'s Bldg . . Hugh Todd 

Nelson Story's Building Morgan ft Walls 

Van Nuys Hotel Morgan 8: Walls 

Santa Barbara, Cal. 

Fithiau Building Thos. Nixon 

Portland, Or. 

Corbett Building Whidden & Lewis 

Failing Building Whidden & Lewis 

Meier & Frank Co.'s Building . . . Whidden ft Lewis 

Marquam Theatre J. M, Wood 

Donald McCleay's Building McCaw & Martin 

Union Meat Co.'s Building Fred T. Peterson 

U. S. Custom House U. S.Super'v'g Arch'cl 

Weinhard Building Henry J. Hefty 

Seattle, Wash. 

Burke Building F. M. Fisher 

Masonic Temple Building Tow lc & Wilcox 

New York Building Boone & v. 

Yester Building R. H. Fisher 

G. Mori is Haller Building V. H. Fisher 

Fairhaven, Wash. 

Allen C. Mason Building Plcklesft Sutton 

Tacoma, Wash. 

Baker Building Pickles ft Sutton 

Fidelity Trust Co s Building . . . . Burnham 3c Hoot 
Mueleiibruch & Mahnekc Building . Pickles ft Sutton 
National Bank Commerce Building, C. LsogloJs 

Bank Building Burnham ft Root 

Tacoma Chamber Commerce Bldg, E. \ Hatht-non 
Tacoma land Co.'s lL»t<l , .G « ft W, D Hewitt 

Tacoma Land Co s Office Building . Pickles & Sutton 

Tacoma City Hall \ %. Hatherton 

Building ... Pickles ft. Satton 

Spokane, Wash. 

"lib Building |ohn K. Dow 

Hank Building . . Cutter \ I 
Public School Building . . , . . Chas. F. Helmle 
The Reriew Building ...... C B. Sea ton 

Butte. Montana. 

Thornton Building White ft Lignell 

Honolulu. H. I. 

Brewer Building . ■■ <; Traphagen 

Flitc Building, Q ..Traphagen 

Judd Building . , •■ -.Traphagen 

Mclntyrc Building C, Traphagen 



72 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




No. IIOO. 

Height, i foot 9 inches. Projection, 1 foot 3 inches. $6.50 lineal foot. Add 1 foot for each mitre. 




No. IIOI. 

Height, 4 feet 6 inches. Projection, 2 feet 3 inches. $15.00 lineal foot. Add 1 foot for each mitre. 




uuiiLi 



No. 1I02. 

Height, 2 feet 6 inches. Projection, 1 foot 6 inches. $10.00 lineal foot. Add 1 foot for each mitre 

■ Please carefully read Page 70." 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



73 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




No. 1103. 

Height, 2 feet 8 inches. Projection, 2 feet 2 inches. $15.00 lineal foot. Add 1 foot for each mitre. 




Height, 4 feet 3 inches. Projection, 3 feet. $20.00 lineal foot. Add 1 foot for each mitre. 







Height, 2 (ret. Projection, i root to inches. 

lineal toot. Add i foot lor each milre. 



j* > 



■ 








iimn 






no. 1 toe. 



. 2 feel f> inches. Projection, 1 foot 6 inches, 
lineal foot Add 1 foot for each mitre. 



Please carefully read Page 70. 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




No. I120. 

Height, i fool 5^ inches. 

For Pilasters, i foot 4V inches, with S' 4 -incli returns 

$10.00 each. 




No. 1123. 

$3.00 each. 
Height Cap, 1 foot 5' 4 inches. Heiyht Base, J}i inches. 
For Pilasters. I foot 4*4 inches, with 4's-inch returns. 
Pilasters with corners 2-inch radius. 





ota*. jii* nit jjMTv 

$ $ .Q 





No 1121. 



Height, 1 foot 5J4 inches. 

I or Pilasters, 1 foot 4^ inches, with 4jS-inch returns. 

J8.00 each. 




>■ each. 
Height Cap, 1 foot 3 inches. Height Base. 7 1 .. inches. 

For Pilasters. 1 foot 4' 4 inches, with 4's-inch returns. 




No. 1127. 

Height, 10 inches. 
For Pilasters, 12', indies, with .S' 4 -ineh returns. $4.00 each. 

■ Please carefully read Page 70.""^ni 



No. 1128. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



75 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




No. 1129. 

Height, 7 inches. 

For Fluted Columns, iofi-inches diameter. 

fc.oo each. 




No. 1130. 

Height, io inches. 

For Pilasters, 2 feet I inch, with S^-inch returns. 

$ 10.00 each. 





Height, r foot 1 1 inches. 

For Pilasters, i foot 4 -' 4 inches, with 4's-inch returns. 

$9.00 each. 



Height. 2 feet 1 ' 4 inches. 
For Pilasters, 1 foot 9 inches, with 8J4 -inch returns. 
$15.00 each. 




No. 1133. 

■I- 1 ench, 




No. II34-. No. 1135. 

Height. 2 feel I '» inches. 
Height Cap, 1 foot .* inches. Height Base. 12S inches. For Pilasters, 1 foot u inches, with 4',-inch returns. 

For Pilasters! 1 foot u inches, with 4's-inch returns. - ch. 

W Please carefully read Page 70.' 



76 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




No. 1136. 





Please carefully read Page 70 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



77 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




No. 1141. 550.00 each. 





No. 1142. f 10.00 each 
Height Cap, 4 leet 1 inch. Height Rise. 1 foot .;'» inches. For Pilasters .} feet i 3 * inches, with j's-inch returns. 

• Please carefully read Page 70.- 



78 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




No. 1175. 



>it ;iif «r^ 




No. 1177. Diameter, i foot 6 inches. $5.00 each. 






No. 1179. Diameter, 2 feet 6 inches. #12.50 each. No. 1180. I Jiameter, 3 feet. $15.00 each. 

gWt" Please carefully read Page 70.-^1 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 



79 




No. 1201. Height. 12 inches. Bond, 4 inches. 
J1.75 lineal foot. 



No. 1202. Length, 4 feet 4^ inches. Height, i foot 3^ inches. 
Bond, 5 inches. $ 10.00 each. 




No. 1203. Height, a feet. Bond, 4 inches. 14.00 lineal foot. 





^p*4Bk>v 


_ 



No. 1204. 





No. 1208. 
Please carefully read Page 70.' 



No. 1 209. 



82 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 



| wmk 



•ui Hjrinrm.in i i unmu t ii u . nt in in l i l t in m nnr 



science: 



r±i.^-u. ion hi umi 



- 





No. 1220. 







-,. 



fc 



' 



4 



No. 1221. 




No. 1222. 




No. 1223. 

Length, 7 feet 1 inch. Height, 1 foot 4'i inches. Bond, 4 inches. $17.50 each. 

■ Please carefully read Page 70.- 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



83 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 





No. 1224. 



No. 1225. 





No. 1226. 



No. 1227. 



Please carefully read Page 70." 



84 



GLAD DING, McBEAN & COMPANY 

ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



85 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 






No. 1240. 



No. 1242. 




No. 1245. 




No. 1243. 

Height, 2 feet .1 inches. Radius, 6 feet. 
Reveal, u', inches. Projection, ;■, 
inches. *; so each. 





No. 1244. 

Inches 

Projection : l . Inches, Rndlus, 2 feet 

10 inches. »; co each. 



No. 1246. 




No. 1247. 





No. 1248. 



No. 1249. 



Height, 17 H inches. Width at bottom, 13X inches. Width at top, ai)f inch - 1 inches. 

Projection, 13 inches - ich. 

tW~ Please carefully read Page TO "%t 



86 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




''— "-V/.,//;J 



No. 1260. 
Height, 2 feet 4 inches. $5.00 lineal foot. 




No. 1261. 
Height, 2 feet 5 inches. $5.00 lineal foot. 




No. 1262. 



No. 1263. 

Height, 3 feet 5 inches. $7-50 lineal foot. 



Please carefully read Page 70. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



87 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 






No. 1270. 



No. 1272. 



Height, i foot 10 inches, i foot 434 inches 
square at base. $9.00 each. 



COPINGS. 




No. I2SO. 



Height. 6 inches. 
For 13 - inch wall, $1.25 lineal fool. 
For 17 ?4 -inch wall, 1.75 " " 
For 21 ' 2 -inch wall, 2.25 " 




No. 1283. 



Height, .;'• inches. 
For 13 - inch wall, $1. 00 lineal l"or>t. 
For 17 ' 4 -inch wall. 1.50 " 
For 21 '.. -inch wall, 2.00 " 



rf~ 







No. 1281. 

Height, i inches. 

For 13 - inch wall, ft.oo lineal foot. 
For 17'+ inch wall, 1.50 " 
For 21 5^ -inch w all. 1.00 " 



No. 1284. 

Height. 5'. inch 
For 13 - inch wall. $1 .«■ lineal fooL 
For 17'* -inch wall, 1.50 " 
For 21 '.-inch wall 






No. 1282. 

Height, 6 inches. 
For 13 - inch wall, jti.oo lineal foot. 
For 17 ' 4 -inch wall, 1.50 " 
For 21 '..-inch wall, 200 " 



No. 



1286. 



I lei^lit. 6 inches. 
For r; - inch wall. ji. 25 lineal foot 
For 17'i-inch wall. 1.75 " 
For 21 '.-inch wall. 225 



No. 1285. 



Height, 7 inches. 
For 13 - inch wall, f 1.50 lineal foot- 
For 1 7 'i -inch wall, 2.00 " 
For 21 '.--inch wall. 2.50 " 



Please carefully read Page 70-' 



88 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




No. 1300. Height, 8% inches. Projection, 3^ inches. Depth at top, 17;^ inches. $2.50 lineal foot. 




IWaVaVM^ 




No. 1302. Height, S'i inches. Projection, 4J4 inches. 
Depth at top, 1454 inches. $2.25 lineal foot. 



No. 1303. Height. 7 l A inches. Projection , V- inches. 
Depth at top. 12 Inches. $1.75 lineal foot. 





No. 1304-. Height. 12 inches. Projection. 6J£ inches. 
Depth at top, 17^ inches. $3.75 lineal foot. 



No. 1305. Height, 12 inches. Projection, 6J£ inches. 
Depth at top. iy% inches. 53.7s lineal foot. 







No. 1306. Height. 11"', inches. Projection, 4 indus. 
Bond, 4 inches. $2.00 lineal foot. 



No. 1307. Height. 1 1 inches. Projection, 1 '„- inches. 
Bond. J inches, fi 65 lineal foot. 



jW^iWa*. 





No. 1308. Height. 7 \ inches. 

Projection, 3 inches. 
Bond, -t inches. J1.25 lineal foot. 



No. 1309. Height, gjt inches. 

Projection, ift inches 
Bond, 4 inches. $0.85 lineal foot. 



No. 1310. Height, 7 inches 

Projection. 3 inches. 
Bond, j inches. (1.00 lineal foot. 





No. 1311. Height. 7 7 - inches. Bond, 4 inche 
$1.25 lineal foot. 



No. 1312. Height, 6pi inches. Bond. 4 inches. 
$1.00 lineal foot. 



Please carefully read Page 70. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



89 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 






No. 1331. 



No. 1333. 





K&4I 





No. 1335. 



No. 1336. No. 1337. 

Please carefully read Page 70.* - 



No. 1338. 



90 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA 

2' 2"- >| 




No. 1353. 

£25.00 each. 



No.';i354. 



Please carefully read Page 70 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



91 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 





*No. 1362. 




K- 13" » 







•No. 1364. 




•No. 1365. 




•Prices Nos. 1362, 1363, [364 and 1365; 5x5 inches, 15c each; 7^17 J< inches, juc each ; roxio inches. $1.25 each; 

12NX12', inches, f.1.50 each ; 15x15 inches, fr.so each. 



Please carefully read Page TO. 



92 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 

No. 1370. 4octs. foot. 



1\ A A A-AK 



No. 1372. 50 cts. foot. 





\r 




7 -L 


_' 


fa> 




■ 




' 2 














~\_ 


i 






<h 


■= — -■ rz=^ \ 




1 - 


' ) 











k2 >! 

No. 1374. $1.25 foo'- 



krM< 4"--> 




No. 1380. J1.50 foot. 



V22= 




No. 1382. 52.25 foot. 




No. 1371. 


40 cts. foot. 




fesl! 'rtlr-^l >\ 






fiitaJvuL J 


k_ <v_ 


■»"»™s'* 


^W*S ■ .—™^«* 


V 



No. 1373. 50 cts 

k~3i"->k-- 


foot. 










A 


, T~ 


r 


I 




kN 




\ 




1 \ 


< 


\ " 


/ 



No. 1375. ji.oofoot. 

K-3^>k-4---> 




No. 1377. $1.00 foot. 

k- --8— —4-2? 




ynsnjn^uinq 



)QQQGQI;UJ; 



No. 1381. $1.75 foo'- 




No. 1383. $2. 00 foot. 



Please carefully read Page 70. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



93 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 




No. 1390. 
Bond, 4 inches. $1.75 lineal foot. 




No. 1391. 

Bond, 4 inches. $2.00 lineal foot. 




No. 1392. 

Bond, 4 inches. $ 1.50 lineal foot. 




No. 1393. 
Bond, 4 inches. $2.50 lineal foot. 



6-"— ■ $ y -e- 






10 

No. 1395. 

- 



■ Please carefully read Page 70. 



94 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 



CHIMNEY COPING. 

No. 1400. No. 1401. 



No. 1402. 





$4 . 00 Per Flue 



T". I I 



T~T 



T~L 



t — r 




No. 1403. No. 1404. 



No. 1405. 



$8. 00 P.,- Flue 




T f 



No. 1408. No. 1409. 




SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



95 



ARCHITECTURAL TERRA COTTA. 
CRESTINGS. 

Note.— Orders should state angles of roofs. 




P --12" >!< 12- 

No. 14-20. 75 cts. lineal foot 



K 12" ■* IS 3 * ^ 

No. 1421. Ji.oo lineal fool. 




No. 1422. $1.25 lineal foot. 




|< , .». _ |0 «_ 

No. 1423. $1.50 lineal foot 




No. 1424. fa-SO lineal foot. 
■ Please carefully read Page 70." 



— A 



96 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 



On this and the following pages we have given photos of a few of the 
buildings for which we have furnished Architectural Terra Cotta, Pressed Brick, 
Hollow Tile Fire Proofing and Roofing Tile, etc. 




WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Percy & Hamilton, Architects. 

We furnished lor this building our standard shape Gray Brick, Shade No. 60, and Terra Cotta 
to match, also Enamelled Hollow Tile for the interior light court. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



97 




MILLS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
BURNHAN & Rout, Architects. 



We furnished the Light Bufl Terra Cotta Trimmings, also the Hollow Tile Fire Proofing for the 

interior of this building. 



98 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




UNION TRUST COMPANY'S BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Clinton Day, Architect. 

We furnished for this building our Roman shape Buff Brick, Shade No. 38, with Terra Cotta to 
match ; also all the Hollow Tile Fire Proofing for the interior construction, and our system 
of Fire Proof Roof Construction illustrated on page 39. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



99 




- 



MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY'S BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Clinton Hay. Architect. 

We furnished lor this building a light buff Roman shape Brick, with Terra Cotta Trimmings to 
match ; also all the Hollow Tile Fire Proofing for the interior construction, and our system of 
Fire Proof Roof Construction illustrated on page 39. 



100 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




CLAUS SPRECKELS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Reid Brothers, Architects. 

All the exterior of this building, above the 16th story, is a Gray Terra Cotta and Roofing Tile to 
match the sandstone below that line ; we furnished this ; also all the Hollow Tile Partitions 
throughout the interior of the building. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



101 



it 




111 1 ill 





HALL OF JUSTICE. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Shea & Shi \. Architects. 

We furnished lor this building our standard shape Grey Brick, Shade No. 60. with Terra Cotta 

Trimmings to match. 



102 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




YOUNG BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Kenitzer & Bakth, Architects. 

We furnished for this building our standard shape Gray Brick, Shade 60, with Terra Cotta to match. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



103 




FIDELITY TRUST COMPANVS BUILDING, TACOMA. WASHINGTON. 

BuRNHAM & Root, Architects. 

We furnished the Burl Terra Cotta Trimmings, also the Hollow Tile Fire Proofing tor the interior ol 

this building. 



104 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




CLARK BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Edward R. Swain, Architect. 

We furnished our standard shape Buff Brick, Shade No. 38, and Terra Cotta to match for 

this building. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



105 




HALE BROTHERS' BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Reid Brothers, Architects. 

We furnished lor this building our Roman shape Cream White Brick, Shade No. 75. and Cream 

White Terra Cotta, Shade No. 205. 



106 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




SPOKANE CLUB BUILDING, SPOKANE, WASHINGTON. 
John K. Dow, Architect. 

We furnished our standard shape Mottled Cream White Brick and Cream White Terra Cotta, 

Shade No. 205, for this building. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



107 




BURKE BUILDING, SEATTLE, WASHINGTON. 
E. H. Fisher, Archil 
We furnished the Red Terra Cotta Trimmings for this Building. 



108 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 







..■■ - , T- 



MISSION HIGH SCHOOL BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Havens S; Tobpke, Architects. 

We furnished for this building our Roman shape Buff Brick, shade No- 38, and Buff Terra Cotta, Shade No, 220. 




SPRING VALLEY WATER WORKS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Clinton Day, Architect. 

We furnished for this building a cream white Roman shape Brick, with Terra Cotta to match; also the Hollow Tile Fire Proofing 

for the interior, and our system of Fire Proof Roof Construction shown on page 39, 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



109 




AFFILIATED COLLEGES BUILDINGS, SAN FRANCISCO, CA1. 

J. E. Krai ft, maktens & Coffey, Architects. 
We furnished for these buildings our standard shape Buff Brick, with Terra Cotta Trimmings to match. 




MEIER & FRANK CO."S BUILDING. PORTLAND. OREGON. 
wbiddbm x i nu> Architects. 

\\ i tarnished >°r this bwBdtag our Roman shape Brick. Shade No J&, and Cream White Terra CotU. Shade *^ 



110 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




SANTA FE DEPOT, FRESNO, CAL. 

Tile roof of this building is covered wilh our "S" Shape Spanish Tiles. 




SAN FRANCISCO VEREIN BUILDING. 

Salfield & Kohlberg, Architects. 

We furnished for this building our Roman shape Buff Brick, Shade No. 3S. with Terra Cotta Trimmings to match. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



111 




OAKLAND GAS LIGHT AND HEAT CO.'S BUILDING, OAKLAND, CAL. 

CoxHKAH Mi COXHEAD, Architects. 
We furnished the Buff Terra Cotta and Brick used in this building. 




THE VAN NUYS HOTEL, LOS ANGELES CAL. 

v .s. walls. Architect'. 
Wr furnished for this building our Cream White Term Cotta. 



112 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




RESIDENCE MR. CHARLES PAGE, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Frank S. Van Trees, Architect. 
We furnished for this residence our Koman shape Dark Buff Brick, Shade No. 4s. 




RESIDENCE MR. JOHN D. SPRECKELS, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Kkio Brothers, Architects. 
Our Cream White Terra Cotta, Shade No. 205. was the only material used in the exterior of this residence from the foundation 

to the top of the baluster course. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



113 




ELITE BUILDING, HONOLULU, H. I. 

it i;. Traphagrn, Architect. 

We furnished our Roman shape Cream white Brick, Shade No. 75, and Cream White Terra Cotta. Shade No. 105, for thia building, 




MERCANTILE LIBRARY BUILDING. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
ns & 1 

We tarnished! the Buff Terra Cotta Trimming* for thi> building. 



114 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 







BOSTON DRY GOODS STORE, LOS ANGELES. CAL. 
Eisen & Hunt, Architects. 

We famished for this building our Roman shape Buff Brick, Shade No. 34, with Cream While 

Terra Cotta Trimmings. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



115 



fca iljllj fc — IJ W l f 




DELMONICO CAFE. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
Ti^ms vV Moors, Archfti 
We Furnished for this building our Roman shape Ruff Brick. Shade X i the Cream White 

Terra Cotta Trimmings. 



116 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




EEKTT 

mm 
m in 



tit 



gig 




ESS 



FEB BB 



SSI WW 



&m» 



=« 




HOMER LAUGHLIN BUILDING, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

John Parkinson, Architect. 

We furnished for this building our Cream White Terra Cotta. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



117 




im in 



-■~-z 



ST. DUNSTAN BUILDING. SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 
Cl [NTON Day, Architect. 

We furnished for this building our Cream White Terra Con.,. Shade No. 205. and our Roman shape 

Cream White Brick, Shade No. 75. 



118 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




THE HUNT HOTEL, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

John Parkinson, Architect. 

We furnished for this building our Cream White Terra Cotta, Shade No. 205. 



SAN FRANCISCO AND LINCOLN, CALIFORNIA 



119 




FOURTH STREET ENTRANCE, HUNT HOTEL, LOS ANGELES, CAL. 

John Parkinson, Architect. 

Our Cream White Tern Cotta, Shade No 205 *.is used in this entrance. 



120 



GLADDING, McBEAN & COMPANY 




.4 

< 

8 



Ix, 

z 
< 



H 

O 



5 

E 



s 



O 

u 



w 
u 
E 

is 



o 

PL, 

< 
h 

00 



> 



U 

•a 

c 



0J £-< 
3 U3 



T3 Cfi 

S.| 

o 



T3 M 



W a, 

!i= ^ 

>■ — 

C'H 

a S 

a; o 

U o 

a « 

— rt 

"3 o 

Q J2 



5 ° 

•5 "2 



Acid Receivers, Fittings and Crocks .......... 20 

Architectural Terra Cotta ............ 7°~93 

Bonnet Tops ............... 28 

Buildings for which we have furnished Material ....... 96-120 

Chimney Caps .............. 28 

Chimney Copings ............. 94 

Chimney Pipe .............. 24 

Chimneys, Directions for Erecting .......... 26-27 

Chimney Tops . . . . . . . . . . . . . .29-31 

Crestings 95 

Culvert Pipe ............... 16 

Drain Tile Price List ............ 18 

Drain Tile Description ............. 17-18 

Enameled Brick ............. 46 

Enameled Hollow Tile ............. 46 

Fire Brick ............... 45 

Fire Brick Dust 45 

Fire Clay ............... 45 

Fire Tile ............... 45 

Fire Proofing .............. 3^-44 

Flower Pots ............... 32 

Flue Linings 25 

Flush Tank Siphons ............. 12-14 

Grease Traps .............. 6 

Kitchen Sinks .............. 23 

Laundry Tubs .............. 21-22 

Mantels, Pressed Brick . ... 59-65 

Mantels, Tile 

Pressed Brick, Price List ............ 47 

Pressed Brick, Average Coursing .......... 48 

Pressed Brick, Stock Shapes ........... 49-58 

Roofing Tile .............. 69 

Sewer Pipe, Price Lists ............ 4 

Sewer Pipe, Standard Patterns ........... 5 

Sewerage, General Information on the Subject ........ 7~>o 

Starting Plates .............. 27 

Thimbles ............... :^ 

Urns 33 

Vases 34-35 

Water Consumed in Cities and Towns ......... 11 

Water Pipe 15 

Water, Legal Inch ............. 11 

Water, Miners' Inch ............ 11 

Well Tubing 1=, 

TABLES. 

Drain Tile, Capacity . 19 

Rainfall. Cubic Feet and Gallons per Acre ...:.... 19 

Sewers, Discharging Capacity . 10 

Water, Pressure at Various Elevations ......... 10 

i 121 »